Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - Society (X) - U.S. History (X) - World History (X)

Prairie Churches | Count Berthold von Imhoff (Part 1 of 2)

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about a German immigrant artist, Berthold von Imhof, who began in eastern Pennsylvania, then moved to Saskatchewan, his base for work that spread to the Dakotas, Minnesota, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Prairie Churches | Count Berthold von Imhoff (Part 2 of 2)

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about a Roman Catholic, Berthold von Imhoff who painted for churches of many denominations, often donating his work and making each unique. 

Halal - Kosher Dining at Dartmouth

Icon: 
Streaming icon

As student bodies become more diverse, universities must begin to deal with issues such as how to accommodate religious dietary requirements. The Pavilion at Dartmouth College is an inter–religious campus dining hall featuring kosher, halal and vegetarian meals. This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly reports on the new dining area, a joint effort by both Muslim and Jewish students, which includes four separate kitchens, three sets of cooking implements and two dishwashing rooms.

West Virginia | Road to Statehood

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore the events leading to statehood for West Virginia. The five lesson plans provide a guided viewing graphic organizer, primary source documents, maps, and activities to engage students in the study of the presidential election of 1860, the issues of the time, and individuals who played a role in the movment.

First Women Ever Graduate from Army Ranger School

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Find out why two women graduating from the U.S. Army Ranger School is significant with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from August 18, 2015. (Note: Students only need to watch the first 1:40 of the video)

Tallit Making | Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from Religious & Ethics NewsWeekly shows a class of boys and girls preparing for their bar and bat mitzvahs (Jewish coming-of-age ceremonies) by making their own tallits. The tallit is a Jewish prayer shawl composed of a rectangular piece of cloth with fringe along its four corners representing God’s 613 commandments. The tradition of wearing the tallit dates back to the time of the Torah, the Hebrew Bible, when Jews were given the commandment to wear these fringes, known as tzitzit, on their garments.

Students Stick Around for Two Years of College at Innovative Brooklyn High School

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Inform students about a new trend in education: higher education in high school. At Pathways in Technology Early College High School in Brooklyn, New York, students are expected to attend for six years, earning both a high school diploma and a two-year Associate’s degree. P-TECH, and other schools based on the same model, aim to give students from low-income families a head start on college with free, career-oriented coursework. For further background and materials to support student understanding of the issue, see the Teacher’s Guide, Student Handout, and Informational Text.

Walter White versus W.E.B. Du Bois

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In an effort to respond to the economic crisis of the Depression, President Roosevelt, to the dismay of the N.A.A.C.P., put civil rights on the back burner. This strategy was unacceptable to W.E.B. Du Bois, editor of The Crisis, the journal of the N.A.A.C.P. Du Bois asserted that since F.D.R.’s “New Deal” would not assist African Americans, they should instead find their own solutions to poverty and injustice. This video from The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow highlights one of Du Bois’ most controversial ideas -- support for segregated schools -- and N.A.A.C.P. executive secretary, Walter White’s angry response.

Wilmington, North Carolina,1898: Prelude to a Riot

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video highlights Wilmington, North Carolina, in the years leading up to the election of 1898. At the time, Wilmington could boast of idyllic race relations between black and white citizens. Blacks, only thirty years after Emancipation, had become professionals, politicians and shop owners. While blacks prospered, some whites resented what they perceived as a new attitude among blacks of equality or even superiority to their white counterparts. However, the real issue was political power. Whites became fearful that blacks, who were in the majority, would control the city. As the statewide and local elections of 1898 approached, the Democratic Party, then the party of white supremacy, was determined to end black political power in Wilmington.

9/11 Memorial Honors Lives Lost Aboard Flight 93

Icon: 
Streaming icon

See how the victims of Flight 93 will be remembered from now on with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from September 10, 2015.

Jewish Burial Practices

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly uses a mannequin to demonstrate the time-honored Jewish ritual of tahara, in which the dead are washed, purified and dressed in traditional shrouds before burial. In keeping with the Jewish belief of a communal responsibility to bury the dead, Jewish communities throughout the ages have established burial societies, called Chevra Kadishas, whose sole function is to care for the deceased from the time of death until interment. In this video, a member of a Chevra Kadisha explains the process of tahara and why it is considered one of the greatest mitzvahs or commandments to be performed in Judaism.