Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - ELA (X) - Middle (X) - WNET (X) - U.S. History (X)

Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island | EGG: The Arts Show

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the lands on the island were abandoned to the slaves. Frankie Quimby of the Georgia Sea Island Singers speaks of her pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. She also tells how the songs of the slaves also served as escape songs. For more about Sapelo Island, see “Ben Hall of Sapelo Island” and “Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island.”

Maya Lin

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment from New York Voices, renowned architect Maya Lin talks about her work and identity as an American of Chinese descent. Lin has made valuable contributions to American architecture, one of the most popular and perhaps most controversial being the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Some protested her appointment as architect of the memorial because of her Asian heritage. Lin's parents immigrated to America from China to escape communism, but Maya Lin was born in Ohio. In this segment, Lin talks about a museum she is designing and how it will represent a timeline of the Chinese American experience. The museum aims to break down stereotypes of Chinese people and show their legacy of contributions as Americans.

The Gilded Age: Architecture for the Elite | Treasures of New York: "Stanford White"

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This series of videos from Treasures of New York: Stanford White presents the Gilded Age, an era of great wealth and remarkable architecture. Through video, discussion questions, and classroom activities, students explore how architecture, literature, and art reflect the issues and concerns of the time period, and how the era still resonates today.

Animal Shelter Photographer

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

Ben Hall of Sapelo Island

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Egg: the arts show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ben Hall of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island and community. We learn the island is made up of some of the most valuable real estate in America, but its inhabitants have resisted the sort of development that has captured the other coastal islands off the shores of Georgia and South Carolina. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island."

Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island.The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ronald Johnson of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. A festival is held each year to bring people to the island to learn about the culture and foster interest in preserving the culture. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ben Hall of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island".

City Horses Part I

Icon: 
Streaming icon

When you think of horses you don’t usually think of the city, but in this segment from Wild TV, Carolyne DeGrammont tells us about the Cedar Lane Stables in Queens, one of the five boroughs of New York City. People with different levels of skills with horses as well as people from all disciplines and backgrounds come to the stables. For Carolyne, going to the stables helps her find relief from the stresses of her fast-paced day. She can forget all of her troubles and feel happy. The atmosphere helps her feel connected to nature, too.

Symbolism in "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" | A Walk Through Harlem

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This segment from A Walk Through Harlem presents the poem, "The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” written by Langston Hughes in 1922.  Hughes traveled to New York City by the 1920s to become a part of an exciting arts and culture movement called the Harlem Renaissance.  He later became known as the "poet laureate of Harlem." Hughes was one of the first African American writers who wrote about the authentic experiences of his people reflecting their pain, suffering, humor, creativity, and joy. Hughes made substantial artistic contributions to the Harlem Renaissance and holds an important place in American literature.  

Quoting Abraham Lincoln

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This excerpt from the PBS series Looking for Lincoln, features clips of Presidents Ronald Reagan, George W. Bush and Barack Obama quoting Lincoln's oratory-not always accurately-to lend his historical weight to their own speeches.

The Negro Speaks of Rivers | A Walk Through Harlem

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This segment from A Walk Through Harlem presents the poem, "The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” written by Langston Hughes in 1922 when he was eighteen years old. Born in Joplin, Missouri, Hughes traveled to New York City in the 1920s to become a part of an exciting arts and culture movement called the Harlem Renaissance. He later became known as the "poet laureate of Harlem." Hughes was one of the first African American writers who wrote stories about the authentic experiences of his people reflecting their pain, suffering, humor, creativity, and joy. He often was inspired by music and incorporated it into his poetry. Hughes made substantial artistic contributions to the Harlem Renaissance and holds an important place in American literature.

Finding Their Voice

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In the 1920s, thousands of African Americans left the rural South for cities in the North in a movement called "The Great Migration."  Their arrival in New York City marked a period called "The Harlem Renaissance."  In this video segment from A Walk Through Harlem, we learn that only 30 years earlier many of these descendants of slaves had worked as poor sharecroppers. Although slavery had ended, many blacks were still uneducated. Their shift to the urban North was an attempt to escape the violence and oppression they experienced in the South. They created a new voice for themselves during the Harlem Renaissance, which was a social, artistic and cultural movement.

Jane Jacobs

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from New York Voices describes Jane Jacobs who worked in the 1950s and 60s to save the neighborhoods of New York City. The author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Jacobs disagreed with the notion that the city's oldest neighborhoods should be demolished to make way for high-rise buildings, housing projects and six- lane highways. Her advocacy challenged and successfully derailed Robert Moses, America's most prolific developer, in his plan to cut lower Manhattan in half with a multi-lane highway. Jacobs challenged builders to think about what neighborhoods meant to the everyday lives of the people who lived there. Jacob's ideas changed the thoughts and future for millions of people.

Is This a Map of the Underground Railroad?

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Gwendolyn Wright from The History Detectives has a mission: to determine if Anne Zorela's antique map is a diagram of the Underground Railroad routes.  One reason Anne believes the map is authentic is because of the Quaker meeting houses pictured. The Quakers helped fugitive slaves along the railroad routes. The documented region was also a known hotbed of Underground Railroad activity. These and other reasons have her convinced but she wants more proof to support her conclusion. Professor Gwendolyn Wright disagrees with Anne because fugitives as well as conductors and helpers on the Railroad would've been discovered and killed if a map fell into the wrong hands.

The New Negro

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Arturo Schomburg, a historian, writer and collector of artifacts of African culture and history, was an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Today, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is a national research library that collects, preserves and provides access to resources documenting the history and experiences of peoples of African descent. This video segment from A Walk Through Harlem discusses Schomburg's life and talks about some of the important writers and poets of the Harlem Renaissance.

The Sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis

Icon: 
Streaming icon

During World War II, the South Pacific Philippine Sea was not only the site of many battles but also where the United States had many ships stationed.  One of the ships was the U.S.S. Indianapolis, which sank after being torpedoed by an enemy submarine. This History Detectives video segment chronicles that attack from the perspective of one survivor, L.D. Cox.  While being interviewed about his memories of a fellow sailor, Cox describes the sinking from the instant the boat was hit to the moment he heard the engines of the rescue planes.  He illustrates his furious swim away from the sinking vessel, surviving extreme dehydration and floating for days in shark-infested waters. 

Pages