Social Studies

ELA (X) - Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - Elementary (X) - U.S. History (X)

Who's That Stepping on Plymouth Rock?

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Plymouth Rock is the most solid piece of history the United States has.

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Grade Level: 
Elementary
Middle
Length: 
00:23
Who's That Stepping on Plymouth Rock?

The Pilgrims of Plimoth

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The arrival of the Pilgrims in the new world is chronicled in this dramatic re-enactment of their daily activities during the first trying years in the colony they called Plimoth.

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Grade Level: 
Elementary
Middle
Length: 
00:26
The Pilgrims of Plimoth

I Could Do That!

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At a young age, Esther Morris began to do things that her parents and others doubted that she could do.

Grade Level: 
Primary
Elementary
Middle
Length: 
00:17
I Could Do That!

MN Original | Librettist & Composer Dominick Argento

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Watch now: In 1962, the Walker Art Center commissioned Dominick Argento to compose an opera for Center Opera, now known as Minnesota Opera. More than 50 years later, Minnesota Opera continues to emphasize new works by contemporary librettists and composers, including a 2014 revision of Argento’s “The Dream of Valentino,” which premiered in 1993 at the Kennedy Center.

Among the many awards to his name, Argento has a Pulitzer Prize and a National Opera Association Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also Composer Laureate for the Minnesota Orchestra.

For more MN Original resources, click here.

Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island | EGG: The Arts Show

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This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the lands on the island were abandoned to the slaves. Frankie Quimby of the Georgia Sea Island Singers speaks of her pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. She also tells how the songs of the slaves also served as escape songs. For more about Sapelo Island, see “Ben Hall of Sapelo Island” and “Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island.”

Nebraska History Moments in Language Arts and Fine Arts

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Nebraska fun facts that are historical, arts related, science and literature based. This content falls under Nebraska State standards for Social Studies, Science, Fine Arts and Language Arts.

West Virginia Statehood | You are There

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Explore the West Virginia Statehood movement through the eyes of individuals who lived during that time period with this video from WV Public Broadcasting.  Students will hear news reports from locations around the new state, see interviews with a soldier, people on the street, and learn more about the naming of the state and creation of the state seal and motto.

Edison: Boyhood and Teen Years

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Find out how young Thomas Edison’s curiosity got him into trouble, and how, during his teen years, he lost his hearing but gained confidence as an aspiring inventor, in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Edison. As portrayed through reenactments, we learn that Edison, who had just three months of formal schooling, grew up reading and conducting chemistry experiments. His job as a newsboy on a train inspired his fascination with the telegraph. After teaching himself Morse Code so he could send and receive messages, Edison took a job as a telegraph operator at the age of 15. Through his work, and despite premature hearing loss, he developed an understanding of how the telegraph system operated and how he might improve it. He began to think of himself as an inventor. This resource is part of the Thomas Edison Collection.

Click on the links below to download a customizable Student Handout, Student Reading and transcript for this resource.

Student Handout | Student Reading | Transcript

Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign | Move to Include

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Spread the Word to End the Word is an educational campaign to increase awareness for the need to respect and inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The initiative is supported by Special Olympics and Best Buddies and numerous other organizations. It promotes using people first accepting language in schools and in the community.

Visit the Move to Include collection for more resources. 

Historical Document Research | History Detectives

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History Detective Tukufu Zuberi investigates a letter which indicates that thirty years before John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln, Booth’s father threatened to kill another sitting president, Andrew Jackson. The letter to Jackson reads, “You damn’d old scoundrel… …I will cut your throat whilst you are sleeping.” It’s signed “Junius Brutus Booth.” The writer insists Jackson pardon two men who were sentenced to death. Why did the fate of these two men enrage such fury? Was the Booth letter a hoax? Or does assassination run in the Booth blood?

Animal Shelter Photographer

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In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

Ben Hall of Sapelo Island

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This video segment from Egg: the arts show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ben Hall of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island and community. We learn the island is made up of some of the most valuable real estate in America, but its inhabitants have resisted the sort of development that has captured the other coastal islands off the shores of Georgia and South Carolina. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island."

Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island

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This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island.The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ronald Johnson of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. A festival is held each year to bring people to the island to learn about the culture and foster interest in preserving the culture. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ben Hall of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island".

City Horses Part I

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When you think of horses you don’t usually think of the city, but in this segment from Wild TV, Carolyne DeGrammont tells us about the Cedar Lane Stables in Queens, one of the five boroughs of New York City. People with different levels of skills with horses as well as people from all disciplines and backgrounds come to the stables. For Carolyne, going to the stables helps her find relief from the stresses of her fast-paced day. She can forget all of her troubles and feel happy. The atmosphere helps her feel connected to nature, too.

Rosemary Wells

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Rosemary Wells is the author and illustrator of delightful books for youngsters. In this interview, Wells talks about creating books for children and their adult readers that will stand up to being read over and over again. Watch the interview, view the interview transcript, read a short biography on Rosemary Wells, or see a selected list of her children's books.

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