Social Studies

ELA (X) - Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - Elementary Social Studies (X) - U.S. History (X)

Nebraska History Moments in Language Arts and Fine Arts

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Nebraska fun facts that are historical, arts related, science and literature based. This content falls under Nebraska State standards for Social Studies, Science, Fine Arts and Language Arts.

West Virginia Statehood | You are There

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Explore the West Virginia Statehood movement through the eyes of individuals who lived during that time period with this video from WV Public Broadcasting.  Students will hear news reports from locations around the new state, see interviews with a soldier, people on the street, and learn more about the naming of the state and creation of the state seal and motto.

The Boo Hag | A World of Stories

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North Carolina-based storyteller Donna Washington tells a scary tale from the Gullah culture about a man and his beautiful wife—who is not what she seems to be. The story explains the Gullah tradition of painting doors and windows blue to keep witches away

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories collection.

Porte Crayon

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Discover the works done by the writer and illustrator known as Porte Crayon.

The Master of the Pause | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Twain was a genius of the stage. He had a long drawl and used silence to his advantage. The pauses were the preludes to a cascade of humor.

Edison: Boyhood and Teen Years

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Find out how young Thomas Edison’s curiosity got him into trouble, and how, during his teen years, he lost his hearing but gained confidence as an aspiring inventor, in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Edison. As portrayed through reenactments, we learn that Edison, who had just three months of formal schooling, grew up reading and conducting chemistry experiments. His job as a newsboy on a train inspired his fascination with the telegraph. After teaching himself Morse Code so he could send and receive messages, Edison took a job as a telegraph operator at the age of 15. Through his work, and despite premature hearing loss, he developed an understanding of how the telegraph system operated and how he might improve it. He began to think of himself as an inventor. This resource is part of the Thomas Edison Collection.

Click on the links below to download a customizable Student Handout, Student Reading and transcript for this resource.

Student Handout | Student Reading | Transcript

Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign | Move to Include

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Spread the Word to End the Word is an educational campaign to increase awareness for the need to respect and inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The initiative is supported by Special Olympics and Best Buddies and numerous other organizations. It promotes using people first accepting language in schools and in the community.

Visit the Move to Include collection for more resources. 

Rob Pene's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Rob Pene was born in American Samoa and came to the United States on a baseball scholarship. Unsuccessful in his major-league tryouts, he pursues his passion through an urban ministry. He also writes and performs Christian rap. The sudden death of his father challenges Pene’s commitment to his chosen path.

Jeneen Robinson's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Jeneen Robinson is an African American single mother, as well as a newly ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. She balances the responsibilities of parenting, schoolwork, and creating an original preaching style.

Ben Hall of Sapelo Island

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This video segment from Egg: the arts show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ben Hall of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island and community. We learn the island is made up of some of the most valuable real estate in America, but its inhabitants have resisted the sort of development that has captured the other coastal islands off the shores of Georgia and South Carolina. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island."

Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island

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This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island.The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ronald Johnson of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. A festival is held each year to bring people to the island to learn about the culture and foster interest in preserving the culture. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ben Hall of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island".

City Horses Part I

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When you think of horses you don’t usually think of the city, but in this segment from Wild TV, Carolyne DeGrammont tells us about the Cedar Lane Stables in Queens, one of the five boroughs of New York City. People with different levels of skills with horses as well as people from all disciplines and backgrounds come to the stables. For Carolyne, going to the stables helps her find relief from the stresses of her fast-paced day. She can forget all of her troubles and feel happy. The atmosphere helps her feel connected to nature, too.

The Blizzard of '49 | Operation Haylift & Snowbound

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The Storm of the Century: The Blizzard of 49 is a WyomingPBS documentary.  This documentary tells the story of the worst series of storms in Wyoming's history.  But for all the tragedy and loss, suffering, and death, there was hope and heroism, unselfish sacrifice, and generosity. Students will learn about the Blizzard of 1949 and the emergency actions taken by the United States government in response.

The resource videos are based on this documentary and include associated lesson plans.  There are two video clips. Clip one starts at the beginning and ends at 3:25 minutes, Clip two begins at 3:40 minutes and ends at 8:02 minutes. 

 

 

Students will learn about the Blizzard of 1949 and the emergency actions taken by the United States government in response.

Native American Reaction to Western Immigration | Wild Nevada

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Why does change often result in conflict? Learn about the Native American reaction to western immigration of the Great Basin in Nevada as told to Wild Nevada by Leah Brady, Shoshone historian. Understanding the concept of change and its effects is fundamental to understanding history.  The story of westward expansion includes many aspects of change. Students will explore how conflicts and compromise shaped Nevada’s history by exploring how westward expansion affected the Native Americans living in the Great Basin, in Nevada. By analyzing multiple perspectives on the topic, students will gain a deeper understanding of how Native Americans responded to the closing of the frontier.

Manifest Destiny | Wild Nevada

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Manifest Destiny, our nation’s idea that is it our “obvious fate” or God-given right to own the entire continent of North America from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean, drove western expansion in the 1800s. As the United States expanded westward, it brought enlightenment, freedom, technology and democracy with it. In this inquiry, students will challenge their understanding of manifest destiny by looking at multiple perspectives on how westward expansion affected the Native Americans living in the Great Basin, in Nevada. By analyzing multiple perspectives on the topic, students will gain a deeper understanding how Native Americans responded to the closing of the frontier.

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