Social Studies

Fine Arts (X) - ELA (X) - Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X)

MN Original | Librettist & Composer Dominick Argento

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Watch now: In 1962, the Walker Art Center commissioned Dominick Argento to compose an opera for Center Opera, now known as Minnesota Opera. More than 50 years later, Minnesota Opera continues to emphasize new works by contemporary librettists and composers, including a 2014 revision of Argento’s “The Dream of Valentino,” which premiered in 1993 at the Kennedy Center.

Among the many awards to his name, Argento has a Pulitzer Prize and a National Opera Association Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also Composer Laureate for the Minnesota Orchestra.

For more MN Original resources, click here.

Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island | EGG: The Arts Show

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This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the lands on the island were abandoned to the slaves. Frankie Quimby of the Georgia Sea Island Singers speaks of her pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. She also tells how the songs of the slaves also served as escape songs. For more about Sapelo Island, see “Ben Hall of Sapelo Island” and “Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island.”

Nebraska History Moments in Language Arts and Fine Arts

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Nebraska fun facts that are historical, arts related, science and literature based. This content falls under Nebraska State standards for Social Studies, Science, Fine Arts and Language Arts.

West Virginia Statehood | You are There

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Explore the West Virginia Statehood movement through the eyes of individuals who lived during that time period with this video from WV Public Broadcasting.  Students will hear news reports from locations around the new state, see interviews with a soldier, people on the street, and learn more about the naming of the state and creation of the state seal and motto.

'Breaking Bad' Star Bryan Cranston Steps into LBJ’s Shoes on Broadway

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Actor Bryan Cranston is best known for his role on the hit AMC drama, Breaking Bad. But he also played President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Broadway show, All the Way. Help students analyze the arts with this PBS NewsHour video and educational materials from May 5, 2014.  For further background and materials to support student understanding of the issue see the Teacher’s Guide, Student Handout, and Informational Text in Support Materials.

Striking a Balance Between New and Old in Havana

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Find out why the unique architecture of Havana may be threatened by new development with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 16, 2015.

The Boo Hag | A World of Stories

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North Carolina-based storyteller Donna Washington tells a scary tale from the Gullah culture about a man and his beautiful wife—who is not what she seems to be. The story explains the Gullah tradition of painting doors and windows blue to keep witches away

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories collection.

Censorship Still Apparent as Cuba Forges Place in the Art World

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Explore the challenges facing Cuban artists with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 30, 2015.

"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" Brings Back Beloved Characters and Record Ticket Sales | PBS NewsHour

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Discuss the factors that make the "Star Wars" franchise such a success with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from December 17, 2015.

Public Art in the Gilded Age | Treasures of New York: "Stanford White"

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Learn about the famous statue sculpted by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, “Diana of the Tower,” that sat atop Stanford White’s Madison Square Garden during the Gilded Age in this video from Treasures of New York: Stanford White. Through video, discussion questions, and classroom activities explore how public art reflects society and serves as a vivid connection to history.

Porte Crayon

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Discover the works done by the writer and illustrator known as Porte Crayon.

Picturing Japanese American Internment: Dorothea Lange

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This media gallery explores the government-issued Japanese American internment that occurred during World War II using two videos from the American Masters film Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning. Dorothea Lange, a documentary photographer hired by the government, captures the plight of internees forced to leave their lives and homes behind. Learn about Lange’s struggle to document the reality of internment and the censorship she faced for not doing the exact job she was hired to do. The related materials draw on the videos and focus mainly on visual literacy (the ability to interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from information presented in images) as it relates to Japanese internment.

Talk with Your Students about Aretha Franklin: They All Know the Queen of Soul | PBS NewsHour

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Read the summary below, first. Then watch the video and answer the discussion questions in our support materials. 

Teaching tip: To help students follow along, have them read the story's transcript. To learn more about Aretha Franklin's life, read this story and check back for updates in the coming days.

Summary:

On August 16, 2018, legendary singer Aretha Franklin, the ‘Queen of Soul,’ died of cancer at her home in Detroit, Michigan, at the age of 76. Over the course of a seven-decade music career, Franklin won 18 Grammy awards and had 17 top hits with songs like Respect, (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman and Say a Little Prayer. Franklin fought for civil rights throughout her life and was given an award by Martin Luther King in 1968. She sang at King’s funeral just two months later. In 1987, she became the first woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In November 2015, NewsHour’s Gwen Ifill (who passed away in November 2016) interviewed Franklin after an event at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. Franklin had just been awarded the “Portrait of a Nation” prize. 

August 16, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Maya Lin

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In this video segment from New York Voices, renowned architect Maya Lin talks about her work and identity as an American of Chinese descent. Lin has made valuable contributions to American architecture, one of the most popular and perhaps most controversial being the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Some protested her appointment as architect of the memorial because of her Asian heritage. Lin's parents immigrated to America from China to escape communism, but Maya Lin was born in Ohio. In this segment, Lin talks about a museum she is designing and how it will represent a timeline of the Chinese American experience. The museum aims to break down stereotypes of Chinese people and show their legacy of contributions as Americans.

The Gilded Age: Architecture for the Elite | Treasures of New York: "Stanford White"

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This series of videos from Treasures of New York: Stanford White presents the Gilded Age, an era of great wealth and remarkable architecture. Through video, discussion questions, and classroom activities, students explore how architecture, literature, and art reflect the issues and concerns of the time period, and how the era still resonates today.

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