Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - ELA (X) - Middle (X) - Language (X) - U.S. History (X)

The Gilded Age: Architecture for the Elite | Treasures of New York: "Stanford White"

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This series of videos from Treasures of New York: Stanford White presents the Gilded Age, an era of great wealth and remarkable architecture. Through video, discussion questions, and classroom activities, students explore how architecture, literature, and art reflect the issues and concerns of the time period, and how the era still resonates today.

Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign | Move to Include

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Spread the Word to End the Word is an educational campaign to increase awareness for the need to respect and inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The initiative is supported by Special Olympics and Best Buddies and numerous other organizations. It promotes using people first accepting language in schools and in the community.

Visit the Move to Include collection for more resources. 

Author Wes Moore Explores Where Two Lives Diverge

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One name, two starkly different lives - that's the real-life scenario at the heart of author Wes Moore's new book, which explores how his life diverged from that of another boy with the same name who grew up in the same inner city Baltimore neighborhood.

Montana Mosaic: Montana Industry - The Tourism Years

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A booming national post-WWII economy created a large American middle class with the means and desire to travel. With Montana’s wide open spaces, clean air, lovely mountains, camping, hunting and skiing, tourism became increasingly important to the state’s economy. Federal government investments in highways and in defense (particularly Cold War era missile silos) also dramatically impacted the state’s economy….and brought more visitors.

Montana Mosaic: Next Generations in Indian Country

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In some ways the Indian Boarding Schools did exactly what they set out to do - break the cycle of elders teaching the children traditional ways, lore, culture, and language. But intermingling children from differing nations resulted, in some cases, in awakening political identity for Native Americans in general. Instead of demanding rights for one Nation, now there was a push like the American Indian Movement that could rally hundreds of Nations into a concerted voice for rights and issues. Today’s Native Americans may have much more power unified than ever before!

Montana Mosaic: Jeannette Rankin Suffragette

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Montanans are tied subtly and deeply to the nation and the world. Federal politics have affected the daily lives of Native Americans, students, senior citizens, and ranchers. International markets affect everything from crop selection to timber prices in Montana. Montanans fight for what they believe in…like Montana’s Jeannette Rankin. An acknowledged pacifist, she voted against U.S. involvement in both World Wars. Her stand incurred the wrath of millions of Americans— including many, but not all, Montanans. Jeannette Rankin reflects Montana toughness, courage, and integrity. She is a Montana story.

Montana Mosaic: Ethnic Diversity in Montana

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Montana is a state populated by waves of immigrants who joined the American Indians who find their creation stories in the state.  Mining, trapping, logging, agriculture, and political unrest in other parts of the world are just some of the reasons people move to Montana.  But this is not a phenomenon that is over...immigration is very much a 21st Century issue in Montana which shares a very long, unguarded border with Canada.  Old immigrants join new immigrants in bringing their traditions and cultures with them and celebrate them to keep their ethnicity alive.

Newspapers in the Digital Age

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the.News reporter Antonio Neves explores changes in the newspaper business. He investigates how stories are covered and delivered and what changes in economic models are necessary to secure newspapers' continued existence. Explore how the newspaper industry has adapted to stay relevant within the Digital Age by becoming information portals and utilizing social media.

Analyzing King's "I Have a Dream" Speech Video

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In this video, schoolchildren take turns reading from Martin Luther King, Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream Speech" on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

Montana Mosaic: Mining, Labor Unions and the Speculator Mine Disaster

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Gold lured the first prospectors to Montana, and silver attracted industrialists, but it was copper that carried Montana’s economy into the twentieth century. Some of the richest veins of copper in the world lay under the Butte hill, and as the world’s demand for copper soared, Butte’s mines expanded.

Joining together in a labor union was one of the main ways workers could gain power. Unions like the Butte Miner’s Union negotiated with mine owners for better pay and safer working conditions. Improving safety was especially important in the mines, where accidents killed an average of one miner every other day in the 1890s.

 

Montana Mosaic: Experience of Indian Boarding Schools

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Boarding schools were part of an "assimilation strategy" that existed on, near and far removed from reservations. Boarding schools often separated students from their families and cultural traditions.  The boarding-school experience still casts a long shadow over the lives and the culture[s] of many Montana Indians.

Montana Mosaic: Federal Indian Policy

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When the United States annexed Montana land, it imposed federal laws on the newly acquired property and the people already on those lands. Despite tens of thousands of years that native peoples already lived in Montana—the U.S. government dictated Indian policy. Treaties, executive orders, and congressional legislation created that policy. American Indians fought this alien system in the ‘Indian Wars’ of the nineteenth century. Federal Indian policy alternately attempted to isolate Indians on reservations and to assimilate Indians into the Euro-American population. 

American Speech | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Twain made American speech something to be admired. At the time, the European was supposed to be the ideal. But Twain used American vernacular and turned it into literature.

Montana Mosaic: The New Deal in Montana

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Following World War I, Montana slipped into a deep depression that ran right through the 1920s. When the nation dropped into the Great Depression in 1929, Montana struggled even harder. Drought compounded the economic failure and forced some Montanans to abandon the state for the West Coast. Others worked to be self-sufficient. Montana’s mining, timber, and railroad industries bottomed out. The New Deal programs became a lifeline for the economy of Montana – roads and dams set the stage for later tourism and irrigation.

Montana Mosaic: Women Homesteaders in Montana

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Immigrants changed Montana’s economic, political, and social fabric. They directly affected Montana Indian tribes by taking up non-allotment lands on reservations. The homestead ‘bust’ (1917–1930) proved just as dramatic as the ‘boom.’ Farms were abandoned, markets disappeared and towns died. Only the most resilient of settlers adapted to the new conditions and survived, becoming the core of Montana’s current agricultural community.  Contrary to popular opinion, homesteading wasn't for men only - women were able to "prove up" too and these hearty women also changed the fabric of Montana's early years.

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