Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - ELA (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X) - American Culture (X)

The Boo Hag | A World of Stories

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North Carolina-based storyteller Donna Washington tells a scary tale from the Gullah culture about a man and his beautiful wife—who is not what she seems to be. The story explains the Gullah tradition of painting doors and windows blue to keep witches away

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories collection.

The Master of the Pause | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Twain was a genius of the stage. He had a long drawl and used silence to his advantage. The pauses were the preludes to a cascade of humor.

City Horses Part I

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When you think of horses you don’t usually think of the city, but in this segment from Wild TV, Carolyne DeGrammont tells us about the Cedar Lane Stables in Queens, one of the five boroughs of New York City. People with different levels of skills with horses as well as people from all disciplines and backgrounds come to the stables. For Carolyne, going to the stables helps her find relief from the stresses of her fast-paced day. She can forget all of her troubles and feel happy. The atmosphere helps her feel connected to nature, too.

The Mississippi River | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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The Mississippi River was Twain's Harvard and Yale. It was a sacred place for him. Twain said that every character he came up with he met on the Mississippi.

American Speech | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Twain made American speech something to be admired. At the time, the European was supposed to be the ideal. But Twain used American vernacular and turned it into literature.

Dark, Depressive Streak | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Mark Twain's irrepressible humor is always colored by the knowledge that horrible things can happen in life. The dark element gave depth to his work.

The Anguish Underneath the Man | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Arthur Miller discusses the character of Mark Twain. Under the boasting of Mark Twain was a great suffering. He was a symbol of an American dilemma: a great success, with anguish underneath.

Aren't We Funny Animals? | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Hal Holbrook discusses how Twain's writing makes him feel, and the empathy of Twain's writing. It is the humor that Twain finds in mankind that makes his work so enjoyable.

Inclusion | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Arthur Miller discusses the ways Mark Twain included himself in his commentaries and critique of human behavior, and in doing so, achieved greatness in his work.

"Huckleberry Finn" | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Huckleberry Finn is one of Mark Twain's most beloved characters, and the book his masterpiece. Twain's novel was told from a southern perspective, and took away any romanticism with slavery.

The Problem of Race | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Twain knew if America was going to be a great nation, the problem of race had to be talked about and brought to light. Mark Twain saw what America was about and he was not afraid to hold up a mirror.

Hannibal, Missouri | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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The idea of place formed Mark Twain, and through Mark Twain we see Hannibal, Missouri as something of an Eden, a place of eternal summer.