Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Prairie Public (X) - Geography (X)

Uganda: Sustainable Tourism | Ruhija Orphans Group

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Learn about Ruhija Orphans group in Uganda. Children show up at the tourist camp and provide entertainament and tourists will provide money to support initiative.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Bill Patrie

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Learn how Bill Patrie, a North Dakota economic developer, looks for an anchor or signature building which personifies a community, has structural integrity, and is located in a town where residents believe in the future.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

A Photographer’s View of Iceland | Nyholl and Dettifoss

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Photographer Wayne Gudmundson and his daughter Liv visit their ancestral home and the spectacular falls of Dettifoss and discuss the family’s emigration from Iceland. Travel to Iceland where the beautiful landscape and friendly people have inspired countless artists, including Wayne Gudmundson, to capture the sights and explore its volcanic majesty.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Dunseith

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The closing of the former San Haven Tuberculosis Sanitarium in 1989 resulted in the loss of 400+ jobs. While efforts to rehab that beautiful building failed, it did result in attracting other businesses to replace the jobs in Dunseith, Rolla and Rolette.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Jamestown

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Trying to create an inviting downtown that draws residents and tourists alike, developers, including The Marcil Group, have led the way in rehabbing downtown buildings in Jamestown for a variety of uses. The Franklin School is a prime example of preserving an historic landmark building.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Crosby

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A large commercial building in Crosby, used primarily as a retail store, has been renovated for use as apartments, a hotel room, coffee shop, and other business space with minimal expense.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Grand Forks

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Like many cities, Grand Forks had seen a decline in activity and economic development in its downtown area during the 1960s and 1970s which was escalated by the devastating flood of 1997. Federal assistance and local restoration projects have revitalized the area by rehabilitating the buildings that could be saved.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Revitalizing Downtowns

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Many rural communities are struggling to preserve their downtowns, their economy and their identity, which can be helped by revitalizing historical buildings.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Bowman

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To help the community of Bowman survive, keep business at home, and provide jobs, the town has morphed a grocery store into the library and a lumberyard into a museum.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Welk Barn, Strasburg ND

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All careers begin somewhere, and Lawrence Welk's started on the family homestead farm in south central North Dakota. The original red barn stands not only as a marker for the farm, but as a monument to Welk’s legacy.

A Photographer’s View of Iceland | Drangey Island, Godafoss, Myvatn, and Askja

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The stories of an Icelandic saga’s hero, the “Waterfall of the Gods,” thermal waters and mud pools, and the eruption of a volcano’s effect on immigration. Travel to Iceland, where the beautiful landscape and friendly people have inspired countless artists, including Wayne Gudmundson, to capture the sights and explore its volcanic majesty.

A Photographer’s View of Iceland | Emotional Ties to Iceland and North Dakota

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The study of North Dakota’s Icelandic poet K. N. Julius led Wayne Gudmundson to travel to Iceland and find his roots as well. Travel to Iceland, where the beautiful landscape and friendly people have inspired countless artists, including Wayne Gudmundson, to capture the sights and explore its volcanic majesty.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Hillsboro

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Hear how the Hillsboro Community Partnership has led the rehabilitation of two significant buildings on the central downtown corner of Main Street and Caledonia Avenue.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”
 

 

Uganda: Sustainable Tourism | Women Craft Group

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Learn about Women Craft group in Uganda which consists of over 250 women. The next stage of this project is developing marketing opportunities outside of Uganda.

Elisa Korenne: Steamboats on the Red

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Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it's hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul and Winnipeg. This original song by Minnesota musician Elsia Korenne tells the tale of willpower and cut-throat competition that brought steamboats to the Red and made them work.

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