Social Studies

Science (X) - Social Studies (X) - Physical Science (X) - Geography (X)

Points of Origin

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This animation from KET illustrates how an origin is used for positive and negative measurement along a straight line and on a flat plane. It also shows how an origin, latitude, and longitude identify locations on Earth and explores how measuring temperature differs from measuring height or weight.

Making the Modern Clock | How We Got to Now: Time

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Understand how Galileo discovered that a pendulum could be used to regulate clocks in this clip from How We Got to Now. Support Materials include a background essay on the history of timekeeping and the development of the atomic clock, teaching tips to foster innovation and bring concepts from this clip into the social studies, science, and math classrooms, as well as pre-viewing and post-viewing discussion questions.

Avalanche Town

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In 1995, an avalanche overran an unsuspecting fishing village in Iceland, killing 20 of its residents. Although avalanches are a common occurrence in the region, this was the first avalanche in this village's history to travel as far as the city center. In this video segment adapted from NOVA, learn more about the Iceland avalanche and how engineers plan to protect the village from future avalanches.

The Combustion of Wood

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What happens when wood burns? Learn about the chemistry of combustion, as well as the different types of combustion, including the types that are harmful to human health. 

The new e-book, Engineering is Saving the World with Cookstoves, tells the story of the need for a new design for cookstoves in Darfur and how researchers have worked to make that happen. Videos, animations, and interactive graphics explain the design process, and provide a deep dive into science concepts, like combustion. This video is part of the e-book.

Rolling Thunder River Company | Fast Forward

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We go to McCaysville to meet a group a people who claim their jobs are better than a vacation. They’re river guides at Rolling Thunder River Company, a white water rafting company where the employees, surprisingly, still use math to do those jobs. They also use a host of certifications to ensure customer safety. Oh, and being an Eagle Scout doesn't hurt either.

Above the Clouds: Telescopes on Mauna Kea

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Astronomical research is dependent on technology that allows astronomers to see the universe. Telescopes act as giant eyes, capturing the light from celestial objects and processing it for astronomers to study. Generally, a space-based telescope will offer the clearest views of the universe. However, astronomers have found an ideal site for ground-based telescopes. In this video segment adapted from First Light, learn about recent telescope technologies and one of the best ground locations—Mauna Kea.

Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: The Role of Markets | Carbon Sequestration in Developed Economies

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In this clip, students will learn about reducing the carbon footprint of existing infrastructure.

How Do Avalanches Form?

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There are two basic elements to an avalanche: a steep, snow-covered slope and a trigger that causes a weak layer within the snow pack to collapse. This video segment adapted from NOVA reveals that the shape of the ice crystals of snowflakes within a snow pack is also a critical factor. How well the crystals bond together determines how strong a snow layer is and therefore how stable the snow pack is.

Battle of the Atlantic

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The Battle of the Atlantic was the closest scene of combat to the United States during World War II. Using a magnetometer, NOAA seeks to document the final days for those on board the more than 60 merchant marine and navy warships. Using modern technology, researchers are locating and documenting the sea battle that raged off North Carolina's coast during World War II.

Climate Wisconsin | Extreme Heat

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This multimedia video produced by the Wisconsin Educational Communications Board features Elijah Furquan, a spoken word artist in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, who describes the effects of extreme heat on his urban community.