Social Studies

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Mark Catesby Explores New Worlds

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[00:29:37] Shorter edited version provided by the Catesby Commemorative Trust. In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

The Curious Mister Catesby

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(00:55:28) In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches. Resources includes both volumes of the original book published in 1731. The books contain all his original art work of plant and wildlife specimens completed during his journeys.

The Adventures of Mark Catesby: Unknown Explorer of The New World

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[00:02:51] Overview of naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

Steamboat Jimmy

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Learn about James Rumsey, the first man to invent the steam powered boat, and the challenges he faced when he demonstrated it for a crowd of people.

Historical Document Research | History Detectives

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History Detective Tukufu Zuberi investigates a letter which indicates that thirty years before John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln, Booth’s father threatened to kill another sitting president, Andrew Jackson. The letter to Jackson reads, “You damn’d old scoundrel… …I will cut your throat whilst you are sleeping.” It’s signed “Junius Brutus Booth.” The writer insists Jackson pardon two men who were sentenced to death. Why did the fate of these two men enrage such fury? Was the Booth letter a hoax? Or does assassination run in the Booth blood?

A Pellet of Poison | Medicine Woman

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The strange story of how the lives of two famous women—Marie Curie and Doctor Susan Picotte—intersected in 1915. In the autumn of 1915 on the Omaha Indian Reservation in Nebraska a small package arrived at the home of Doctor Susan Picotte. It contained a tiny pellet of radium sent by Madam Marie Curie to save the life of the first Native American doctor as she lay dying of cancer. 

Earth System: Drought and Air Quality

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Droughts claim more victims each year than any other natural disaster. Depending on where it occurs and how long it persists, the cost of a drought can run into the billions of dollars. Droughts cause more than economic hardship, however. As this video segment adapted from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center demonstrates, droughts have a complex web of impacts that also affect us socially and environmentally.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Galileo on the Moon

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Galileo used thought experiments to test many assumptions, including the notion that heavy objects fall more quickly than lighter objects when they are dropped. Lacking access to either a vacuum chamber or a planetary body that has no atmosphere, he nevertheless correctly predicted that all falling objects would accelerate at the same rate in the absence of air resistance. In this video segment from NASA, astronaut David Scott demonstrates the correctness of Galileo's prediction.

Animal Shelter Photographer

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In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

Generations of Healing | Medicine Woman

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450 square miles. 1,200 patients, Indian and white. One doctor. In the years after medical school, Doctor Susan La Flesche is saving those she can save and comforting those she cannot.

The Total Eclipse of the Heartland

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“Go away clouds!” was the chant of the day at Homestead National Monument. The 2017 total solar eclipse played hide-and-seek with an enormous crowd. This 360 video captures the moment of the eclipse and the huge expectations of the crowd. Bill Nye, CEO of the Planetary Society, and Dr. Amy Mainzer, a NASA jet propulsion Astrophysicist narrate the exciting moments from the stage. (This video will be edited with other locations from throughout Nebraska, including Alliance, Gibbon and Lincoln, giving viewers a full 360 experience throughout the state.)

Holistic Medicine | Medicine Woman

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A Navajo medicine woman, Dr. Lori Arviso Alvord writes, heals with songs, herbs, sand painting, and ceremonies held by firelight in the deep of winter. She believes that everything in life is connected—humans, spirits and nature. She treats the whole person, not just the illness. Dr. Arviso practices hozho, a Navajo word meaning living in harmony and balance.

Crossing Bridges | Medicine Woman

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A common thread weaving together the lives of these Native American women doctors in Medicine Woman is that each woman had to build many bridges or cross many barriers to achieve success. They were women in a male-dominated world.  They were Native Women in a non-native culture. And they carried their traditional healing ways into the western medical model. 

Susan La Flesche Graduates from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania | Medicine Woman

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Susan La Flesche graduates from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania at the head of her class. She’s the first Native American to become a medical doctor at a time in history when even the most privileged white woman faced an uphill battle.

Dedication of the Susan Picotte Hospital & the Death of Dr. Picotte | Medicine Woman

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For many years, Doctor Picotte had dreamed of building her own hospital—a place of healing in the heart of her community. That hospital was finally built and dedicated in 1913. Two years after the hospital opened Doctor Susan La Flesche Picotte died at home in Walthill.

 

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