Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Elementary (X) - High (X) - KET (X) - U.S. History (X)

Gospel Train | The Civil War Era

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In this video, students learn about "Gospel Train". “Gospel Train” is a code-word song used in the Underground Railroad by slaves, often sung just before an escape in an attempt to let all who wished to go know that the time was near. In this segment, folk singers Rhonda and Sparky Rucker perform the piece on harmonica and guitar.

 

Jemima Boone | Drama Based on Historical Characters

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In this video, viewers watch a scene from a play about the daughter of famous Kentucky pioneer Daniel Boone. This scene opens with Jemima recalling a date in 1773. The scene transports us to that day. Daniel and his son James are setting a trap for food.

The Lancers Quadrille | The Civil War Era

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In this video, the Berea Festival Dancers perform two sets of The Lancers Quadrille, a social dance that was popular in Civil War-era America.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin | The Civil War Era

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This is a reader’s theater performance of a scene from George Aiken’s 19th-century dramatization of the novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. In this scene, the escaped slave Eliza reunites with her husband George and their friend Phineas. She recounts how she crossed the Ohio River with their child while escaping from slave hunters. Phineas warns them that the hunters are still in pursuit. Their exaggerated language and performance are characteristic of melodramas, which were popular at the time.

Goin' to Boston | Kentucky/Appalachian Culture

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Goin’ to Boston is a traditional folk dance enjoyed as a “play party game” in Appalachia. Instructor Anndrena Belcher teaches a group of middle school students the song and dance moves. She explains what a “play party game” is and teaches such commonly used folk dance movements as promenade, sashay, reel, and casting the lines.

About the Lancers Quadrille | The Civil War Era

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In this video, dance and music educator Jennifer Rose explains the history of The Lancers Quadrille, including the origin of the dance and why it was popular in Civil War-era America. She also discusses the movements and sets of the dance.

Outdoor Installation

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Truman Lowe, a contemporary sculptor, works with students to create a collaborative art project at Wickliffe Mounds. Wickliffe Mounds, located in western Kentucky, was the home of a now-vanished Native American society—the Mississippian culture—from about 1000 to 1300. Lowe, who is from Wisconsin is of Native American heritage, a Winnebago/Ho-Chunk. The student art installation was intended to honor the legacy of the Mississippian culture.

Simon Kenton | Kentucky Chautauqua

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Mel Hankla presents frontiersman Simon Kenton.

Historic Archaeology at Camp Nelson: Shedding Light on Undocumented Lives

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In this video segment, Dr. Stephen McBride discusses how the analysis of food remains and personal items provide insight into the lives of the soldiers and the families of the black enlistees who trained during the Civil War at Camp Nelson in Jessamine County, Kentucky. The site was an important Union supply depot, training center for U.S. Colored Troops, and refugee camp for families of African-American enlistees. Today the site is a Civil War Heritage Park. Archaeological research has uncovered artifacts left by the soldiers and their families.

Remembering Lincoln in 1975-1977 | Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian."

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From monuments to festivals, Lincoln is remembered in many ways in Kentucky.

This resource is part of the KET Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian." collection.

The Cooper Union Speech | Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian."

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The Cooper Union speech in New York makes a huge impact, bringing the backwoods attorney even farther into the national spotlight.

This resource is part of the KET Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian." collection.

September 20, 2018 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about Hurricane Florence, midterm elections, minimum wage at Disney World, Michigan's water crisis, ocean cleanup, Burmese cats, robotic sailboats, Iceland, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

Making a Career | Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian."

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Abraham Lincoln served 4 years in the Illinois legislature and also passed the bar as a self-taught lawyer. He moves to Springfield, Illinois were he meets his new best friend Joshua Speed.

This resource is part of the KET Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian." collection.

Lincoln’s Admiration for Henry Clay | Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian."

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As a successful attorney and local politician, Lincoln joins the rising upper class in Springfield. He is influenced by the Whig Party leader, another Kentuckian, Henry Clay.

This resource is part of the KET Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian." collection.

Lincoln’s Assassination | Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian."

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Many Kentuckians turn against the war when Lincoln enlists black soldiers. There is also anger toward Lincoln because of the political and economic conditions. On April 14, 1865, Lincoln is assassinated.

This resource is part of the KET Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian." collection.

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