Social Studies

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Scottsboro Boys Stamp | History Detectives

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THE DETECTIVE: Gwen Wright.

THE PLACE: Scottsboro, Alabama.

THE CASE: What is the connection between an inconspicuous black and white stamp purchased at an outdoor market and a landmark civil rights case? “Save the Scottsboro Boys” is printed on the stamp, above nine black faces behind prison bars and two arms prying the bars apart. One arm bears the tattoo “ILD.” On the bottom of the stamp is printed “one cent.” The Scottsboro Boys were falsely accused and convicted of raping two white girls in 1931 on a train near Scottsboro, Alabama. It took several appeals, two cases before the United States Supreme Court, and nearly two decades before all nine finally walked free. History Detectives delves into civil rights history and consults with a stamp expert to discover how a tiny penny stamp could make a difference in the young men’s courageous defense effort.

Prairie Churches | Hope and Prayer

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Learn about the Viking Lutheran Church in Maddock, North Dakota. Dedicated in 1909 it was at that time the largest Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church between the Twin Cities and Seattle.

Prairie Churches | A Hammer and a Nail, A Shovel and a Pail

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Learn about Father Phillip Ruhe, self-taught architect, who was responsible for the building of over 40 churches, including the elaborate Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception at Cooks Creek, Manitoba, built over 22 years by volunteer hand labor.

Looking for Lincoln | All Things Lincoln

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In this video segment, from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. visits the Lincoln Museum to see the iconic “stove pipe” hat firsthand. He then travels to Beverly Hills for a tour of the world’s largest private collection of Lincoln-related artifacts.

Looking for Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln, Attorney at Law

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In this video segment, from the PBS documentay Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin examine Lincoln's years as a "prairie" lawyer on the Illinois circuit, and discuss how they honed and polished Lincoln's confidence, sense of fairness, and social skills.

Welcome (中国欢迎您) from the First Lady

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Join First Lady Michelle Obama as she discusses her upcoming trip to China and invites students to follow her journey.

War on Cocoa Beach | Central Florida Roadtrip

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Many folks are not aware of the fact that in World War II, the war was not ALL being fought across the Atlantic. There were dangers right here in America, off the coast of Cocoa Beach.

Miriam McClendon

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Miriam McClendon was 14 years old when she became involved in the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham, Alabama. In this video segment, McClendon describes how she left school to participate in the Children's Crusade of 1963 and was then arrested and jailed for several days.

Audrey Hendricks

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In 1963, at the age of nine, Audrey Hendricks left school and joined more than 2,000 students in a Birmingham demonstration that came to beknown as the Children's Crusade. In this interview, Hendricks recalls her participation and arrest.

Segregated Schooling in South Carolina

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In 1950, a group of black parents in Clarendon County, South Carolina filed a lawsuit to equalize education for their children. Encouraged by the NAACP and a local minister, the Reverend Joseph Armstrong De Laine, the case became part of the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling. In this video segment, the Reverend De Laine's children, Joseph De Laine Jr. and Ophelia De Laine Gona, recall conditions in their segregated school.

Rosa Parks

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This interview with civil rights activist Rosa Parks describes her role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott. On December 1, 1955, Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Her refusal sparked a massive bus boycott that lasted 381 days, ending on December 21, 1956, after the United States Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation on city buses was unconstitutional.

A Class Divided 1: The Daring Lesson

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When the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered in April 1968, Jane Elliott taught her third-grade class a daring lesson in discrimination. The third time she taught the lesson, cameras were present.In this video segment from FRONTLINE: "A Class Divided,"Elliott divides her class into two groups — those with blue eyes and those with brown eyes — and discriminates against those with brown eyes.

A Class Divided 2: Day Two

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When the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered in April 1968,Jane Elliott taught her third-grade class a daring lesson in discrimination. The third time she taught the lesson, cameras were present.In this video segment from FRONTLINE: "A Class Divided,"Elliott changes the rules, and discriminates against students with blue eyes.

Mendez v. Westminster: Desegregating California's Schools

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In 1946, eight years before the landmark Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, Mexican Americans in Orange County, California won a class action lawsuit to dismantle the segregated school system that existed there. In this video segment, Sylvia Mendez recalls the conditions that triggered the lawsuit and her parents' involvement in the case.

Breaking the Gender Barrier in Little League, 1974

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Ten-year-old Janine Cinseruli, her mother, her brother, and some neighborhood boys answer questions about whether girls should be allowed to play Little League baseball in this 1974 archival news footage from the WCVB Collection, Northeast Historic Film. Janine says most boys don’t care if girls play baseball as long as they’re good at it. The boys interviewed say they agree but express concerns about physical contact with female players. Janine’s mother, who helped Janine file a complaint that ultimately led to a court case, says her daughter has been practicing with boys for years and should be allowed to play.

This video is primary source footage and is presented as originally recorded.

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