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Hajj: Part II | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Over two million Muslims from around the world travel to Mecca each year for the Islamic pilgrimage known as Hajj. How does this experience change their lives? This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly follows American Muslim Abdul Alim Mubarak as he experiences Hajj for the first time.

Scottsboro Boys Stamp | History Detectives

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THE DETECTIVE: Gwen Wright.

THE PLACE: Scottsboro, Alabama.

THE CASE: What is the connection between an inconspicuous black and white stamp purchased at an outdoor market and a landmark civil rights case? “Save the Scottsboro Boys” is printed on the stamp, above nine black faces behind prison bars and two arms prying the bars apart. One arm bears the tattoo “ILD.” On the bottom of the stamp is printed “one cent.” The Scottsboro Boys were falsely accused and convicted of raping two white girls in 1931 on a train near Scottsboro, Alabama. It took several appeals, two cases before the United States Supreme Court, and nearly two decades before all nine finally walked free. History Detectives delves into civil rights history and consults with a stamp expert to discover how a tiny penny stamp could make a difference in the young men’s courageous defense effort.

Prairie Churches | Count Berthold von Imhoff (Part 1 of 2)

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Learn about a German immigrant artist, Berthold von Imhof, who began in eastern Pennsylvania, then moved to Saskatchewan, his base for work that spread to the Dakotas, Minnesota, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Prairie Churches | Count Berthold von Imhoff (Part 2 of 2)

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Learn about a Roman Catholic, Berthold von Imhoff who painted for churches of many denominations, often donating his work and making each unique. 

110: The Rise of Modern Georgia, Part I (Reconstruction and Growth) | Georgia Stories

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This episode tells the history of Georgia's culture from the Civil War onward. The first segment discusses the importance of trains to Atlanta both during and after the Civil War. The second segment tells the struggles of the Reconstruction era, with particular focus on the lives of sharecroppers. The final segment discusses Georgia music starting in the Civil War and the lasting impact the music of the south has had on American musical forms.

Striking a Balance Between New and Old in Havana

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Find out why the unique architecture of Havana may be threatened by new development with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 16, 2015.

Animated GIFs | Off Book

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Off Book explores the visual artistry of one of the oldest image formats used on the web: the animated Graphics Interchange Format. Throughout their history, GIFs have served a variety of purposes, from functional to entertaining. In this episode of Off Book, we chart the history of GIF, explore the hotbed of GIF creativity on Tumblr, and talk to two teams of GIF artists who are reshaping the format with powerful new visual experiences.

The Most Reproduced Photo | Iwo Jima: From Combat to Comrades

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February 23, 1945. A single photograph captured the most famous and reproduced image of WWII and perhaps of all time. It’s difficult to overstate the impact this picture had on the war effort here in the States. Yet the iconic photo was almost never taken. Associated Press photographer, Joe Rosenthal, was positioning himself for the shot on top of Mt. Suribachi when the second flag was suddenly being raised. Barely able to swing his camera up, he snapped the shot. And for 1/400th of a second, time and history stood still. Rosenthal had been rejected from military service, due to his poor eyesight. He would later say he was lucky to catch the perfect shot. Because the second flag went up about noon, the light gave the figure sculptural depth. Rosenthal also noted that the 20-foot pipe the men found for a flagpole was heavy, and that the effort it took to lift it, imparted a feeling of action. He was always modest about his Pulitzer Prize-winning photo, saying, “I took the picture of the flag being raised, but the marines took Iwo Jima.” Despite this photo becoming synonymous with American victory, it was taken on the fifth day of the 36-day battle. Thousands more sacrifices were yet to come before victory could truly be claimed. We look at what happened to men on both sides after the flag went up on Iwo Jima.

Is Photoshop Remixing the World? | Off Book

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Photoshop allows us to alter existing pictures and create unique images. Artists now use Photoshop to create complex imagery that would have been impossible 20 years ago. It has profoundly changed the art of photo retouching, turning a labor-intensive process into a process dominated solely by creativity.

Louis Armstrong Returns to Europe | Ken Burns: Jazz

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Louis Armstrong's triumphant return to Europe.

Lomax the Songhunter

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In Lomax the Songhunter, filmmaker Rogier Kappers seeks to tell Alan Lomax's story by interviewing friends such as Pete Seeger, combined with archival recordings of music greats Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly, and footage of the cotton fields, rock quarries and prisons where Lomax captured America’s quintessential music. Finally, Kappers followed the route that Lomax took so many years ago and traveled to remote villages in Spain and Italy, hearing memories and music from the farmers, shepherds and weavers whose songs Lomax recorded decades earlier.

209: The New South, Part I | Georgia Stories

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At the end of the 19th century, Georgia was undergoing many changes. The Coca-Cola company started up in Atlanta and through massive advertising campaigns came to be a worldwide brand. The Morton Theater provided a haven for African American performers to practice their craft before a crowd. And the tragedy of the lynching of Leo Frank shocked the city.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Individual Freedom

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Learn about the history of automobiles in North Dakota. The automobile age gave freedom of movement and choice for passengers and freight. With more people driving cars, the push came for better roads.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Peerless Transportation

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Learn about the role of railroads in North Dakota history. In their time, railroads had no peer in their ability to move people and goods, although shipping costs were high. The railroad companies helped increase immigration to North Dakota by actively marketing the opportunities here to foreigners, especially Scandinavians and Germans from Russia.

Red River Land | History of Travel | The Skies

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In the early days of the airplane people put on shows to display their flying talent.  Some notable performing aviators, male and female, were known as barnstormers and were from the Red River Valley.  Today modern jet aircraft transport people and freight all over Red River Land.

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