Social Studies

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110: The Rise of Modern Georgia, Part I (Reconstruction and Growth) | Georgia Stories

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This episode tells the history of Georgia's culture from the Civil War onward. The first segment discusses the importance of trains to Atlanta both during and after the Civil War. The second segment tells the struggles of the Reconstruction era, with particular focus on the lives of sharecroppers. The final segment discusses Georgia music starting in the Civil War and the lasting impact the music of the south has had on American musical forms.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Individual Freedom

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Learn about the history of automobiles in North Dakota. The automobile age gave freedom of movement and choice for passengers and freight. With more people driving cars, the push came for better roads.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Peerless Transportation

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Learn about the role of railroads in North Dakota history. In their time, railroads had no peer in their ability to move people and goods, although shipping costs were high. The railroad companies helped increase immigration to North Dakota by actively marketing the opportunities here to foreigners, especially Scandinavians and Germans from Russia.

Old Red Trail | Birth of the Interstate

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Crossing the United States before the federal highway system was in place was very difficult.  Future President Dwight Eisenhower traveled in a military expedition from Maryland to California in 1919 and took that experience with him to the White House.  He signed the Federal Highway Act in 1956, which resulted in the opening of the first part of Interstate 94 in October of 1958 between Valley City and Jamestown.  The video clip also includes discussion of how the interstate highway project was funded, its value in national defense, and secondary road improvement projects.

Chastity's Story: Homelessness

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This film module spotlights Chastity’s story and building a support system for students struggling with poverty.

A Pellet of Poison | Medicine Woman

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The strange story of how the lives of two famous women—Marie Curie and Doctor Susan Picotte—intersected in 1915. In the autumn of 1915 on the Omaha Indian Reservation in Nebraska a small package arrived at the home of Doctor Susan Picotte. It contained a tiny pellet of radium sent by Madam Marie Curie to save the life of the first Native American doctor as she lay dying of cancer. 

Welcome (中国欢迎您) from the First Lady

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Join First Lady Michelle Obama as she discusses her upcoming trip to China and invites students to follow her journey.

Guilford Courthouse | The Southern Campaign

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The Battle of Guilford Courthouse was fought on March 15, 1781. This battle decided the outcome for the Carolinas because even though Cornwallis won, technically, he lost 25% of his force.

Ninety Six: End Game | The Southern Campaign

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Ninety Six was a small frontier town near Greenwood, South Carolina—an essential part of the geography of British strongholds designed to seal off Charleston and the low country from French, Spanish, and Indian attack. At the “Star Fort” in Ninety Six, a band of Loyalists held their ground, waiting to see what would happen.  

On May 21, 1781, General Greene and approximately a thousand troops marched south towards Ninety-Six, to lay siege to the Star Fort.  It is was the longest field siege of The American Revolution. It lasted 28 days.

Kings Mountain: The Turn of the Tide of Success | The Southern Campaign

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Kings Mountain is a rocky wooded hill on the border of North and South Carolina. On October 7, 1780, a thousand Patriots surrounded and attacked the British troops and Loyalist soldiers. This battle would become a major victory and turn the tide for the Patriots.

Brattonsville: Choosing Sides | The Southern Campaign

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After the crushing defeat at Waxhaws, the people of the South Carolina backcountry had a decision to make.  Were they “Tories”—loyal to the crown; or would they become “Whigs” or “partisans” and fight the British invaders? 

General Thomas Sumter gathered militia troops in South Carolina. Militia units consisted of “civilian” farmers and sometimes included Catawba Indians and slaves. The American militia and partisans couldn’t just line up and take on the British. The British forces were too well-trained and disciplined. The Americans had to whittle away at the enemy, strike their supply lines—fight dozens of little battles, rather than one big battle. This strategy became known as “guerrilla warfare.”

In June 1780, the British had established an "outpost" at Rocky Mount, in the Catawba Valley. Lieutenant Colonel George Turnbull sent troops into what are now York and Chester counties to round up and eliminate the rebels. Captain Christian Huck, a loyalist from Philadelphia, was the leader.

In the community of Brattonsville, Martha Bratton sent a message to warn her husband, Colonel William Bratton, that Captain Huck was on his way. The message was delivered by Watt, the family’s African-American slave.

On July 12, 1780, the Patriot militia, led by Colonel Bratton, defeated the British Legion. This battle became known as the "Battle at Williamson's Plantation" or "Huck's Defeat."

Musgrove Mill: Ray of Hope | The Southern Campaign

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August 19th 1780, three days after the Battle of Camden, another battle was fought. British Provincials from Ninety-Six were camped near Edward Musgrove’s grist mill on the Enoree River (Laurens County), with many recuperating from wounds received at the Battle of Cedar Springs.

Funding and support for the production is provided by The National Park Service, The Self Family Foundation, The George Washington Endowment Fund of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, The South Carolina State Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and a contribution from Dr. Charles B. Hanna.

Debating Slavery

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This video segment adapted from Africans in America explores the division among the state delegates to the Constitutional Convention about the issue of slavery. Although some states had already begun to abolish slavery, other states held that the right to own slaves should remain protected by the federal government. What resulted was a debate about the right to personal liberty and the right to own property, which for many included slaves.

WWII Prairie Memories | Kamikazes in the Pacific and Cold in Europe

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Hear the stories of Navy gunner Dick Severson, Fargo, ND; Navy bosun mate Donovan Witham, West Fargo, ND; and infantryman Wayne Rowe relate stories of wartime incidents.

World War II veterans are extraordinary; their bravery inspires us and their sacrifices secured the freedoms we treasure. WWII Prairie Memories is an important collection of veteran voices, a precious piece of history, that communicates the personal challenges and spiritual experience that define this generation of heroes. All three episodes are compilations of selected veteran narratives recorded at these locations: Veterans Bonanzaville USA, West Fargo ND; ND Cowboy Hall of Fame, Medora ND; Prairie Public Studios, Fargo ND; Heritage Hjemkomst Interpretive Center, Moorhead MN; and Morris Legion, Morris MB.

WWII Prairie Memories | Tragedy and Comedy, Life in the Military

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Listen to some of the strongest wartime memories of sailor Jack Schulstad, Barnesville, MN;aviation cadet Henry LaBore, Fargo, ND; sailor John Harrison Abel, Hitterdal, MN; infantryman Loren Olson, Ada, MN; Canadian Army sapper Fred Herring, Morris, MB, and infantryman LeRoy Quernemoen, Fergus Falls, MN. Develop an appreciation for WWII Veterans.

World War II veterans are extraordinary; their bravery inspires us and their sacrifices secured the freedoms we treasure. WWII Prairie Memories is an important collection of veteran voices, a precious piece of history, that communicates the personal challenges and spiritual experience that define this generation of heroes. All three episodes are compilations of selected veteran narratives recorded at these locations: Veterans Bonanzaville USA, West Fargo ND; ND Cowboy Hall of Fame, Medora ND; Prairie Public Studios, Fargo ND; Heritage Hjemkomst Interpretive Center, Moorhead MN; and Morris Legion, Morris MB.

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