Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - High (X) - Geography (X) - Professional Development (X)

Urban Planner

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A professor and graduate student talk about the use of math and technology in city planning.

America Revealed | Gridlock

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Using this video, which examines the solutions to the problem of traffic congestion in New York City’s Times Square, teach a dynamic problem-solution lesson, "No More Traffic Jams: Identifying Gridlock Solutions in Your Community," that supports your STEM curriculum. Students explore how policy, infrastructure and technology changes can impact traffic and identify and design solutions to traffic problems in their communities.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Bridging Culture, Community and Science

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CREST models an interdisciplinary approach to connecting students to their threatened communities, using technology as a tool and place-based education as a vehicle. By engaging in local projects based in the surrounding Gulf of Maine ecosystem, students learn to apply science and technology skills to support their community’s natural, social, and economic resources.

POV | Up Heartbreak Hill: Factors in a Successful College Experience - Lesson Plan

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In this lesson from POV, students will watch video clips that provide glimpses into the lives of two high school seniors who live in New Mexico on the Navajo reservation. They will then analyze a current issue that Native Americans face (college completion) and will consider factors that might contribute to their own decisions either to enter or to complete college. Students will then explore different strategies that might be used to address this problem. The clips used in this lesson are from the film Up Heartbreak Hill, a documentary that follows two Navajo high school students during their senior year as they struggle with forming their identities, managing family relationships and making decisions about their futures.

Shannon Lee Dawdy, Archaeologist and Anthropologist | MacArthur Fellows Program

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In this interview, 2010 MacArthur Fellow Shannon Lee Dawdy explains the link between scholarship and historical preservation in her work as an archaeologist and anthropologist. Dawdy’s work focuses the history of the “Atlantic World” since 1450, including the Southeast United States, Caribbean, and New Orleans. Through her boundary-crossing scholarship, fieldwork, and efforts to engage the public in uncovering the history of their communities, Dawdy is enriching the arenas of historical archaeology and urban preservation. This resource is part of the MacArthur Fellows Program Collection.

Exploring Borderlands | American Passages: Unit 2

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Discover writings based on the experiences of mestizos, people of mixed racial and cultural backgrounds, in this half-hour video from the American Passages series. The U.S./Mexico border region has long been a site of contact, conflict, and new beginnings. It is a place where geographical, cultural, political, and racial boundaries are challenged and restructured. Contemporary Chicano literature and culture arises out of a literary history that begins with the narratives of Spanish exploration.