Social Studies

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Career Connections | Supply Chain Manager

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Meet a warehouse manager who explains how he uses supply chain computer technology to monitor inbound and outbound products in his rewarding job in a large, 24/7, warehouse operation.

Piracy or Defending | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn about how history is in the eye of the beholder and Americans traditionally see their economic successes as progress in this video from the Steamboat on the Red series. In the case of the steamboats, however, the Chippewa people saw the Americans as rude and in violation of international law. When the Native people attempted to enforce their land rights, they were seen as pirates in the eyes of Americans.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Layover in Atlanta: The Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport | Georgia Stories

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 Flying came into vogue at the turn of the century. Asa Candler built a speedway on 300 acres of cotton fields near the village of Hapeville where popular auto races and flying shows were staged. Cities need good transportation features to prosper and Atlanta was already a railroad hub in the South. Local pilots urged that an airport be built but aviation was thought to be a fad. It was not until 1927 when the city of Atlanta bought the speedway and the federal government made Atlanta an airmail stop that the airport really took off. Through the years new terminals were built and billions were pumped in the economy.

New Cargo | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how, beginning in the late 1880s and early 1900s, the cargo transported on the steamboats changed from buffalo robes and furs to hard spring wheat, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. As a result, grain elevators were built along the banks of the river, and farmers were able to get their crops to market fairly quickly.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

People and Businesses | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how communities began to develop on the banks of the Red River along the steamboats’ route in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. With new, cheaper means of transportation come people—first workers, then settlers, then merchants. 

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport | Fast Forward

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There’s a lot to know about Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Sure it’s the busiest airport in the world. And yes, it’s within a 2-hour flight of 80% of the U.S. population. But perhaps the most important characteristic of this “airport city” is that it’s the biggest employer in the state with 58,000 jobs!

Career Connections | Transportation Supervisor

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Hear from a transportation supervisor of a company that relies heavily on vehicle use in its day-to-day operations. Learn about this career that involves maximizing operational efficiency while minimizing costs

‘Talking Cars’ Could Prevent Accidents Before They Happen

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In recent years, car companies have used technology to make cars safer. Now, the U.S. Department of Transportation is considering making features that were previously optional standard. One of these advances is automatic braking. Experts suggest that it could prevent accidents and save lives. Other technologies discussed include vehicle to vehicle communication and the "connected car".

Teachable Moment: Logistics | Fast Forward

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We explain the concept of logistics, why it's important, and how it impacts your wallet!

The Interstate Highway System | Georgia Stories

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Roads are vital for growth and development in any area. Dr. Charles Floyd, a University of Georgia economist, notes that Georgia roads were not paved even into the 1930s. It was Pres. Franklin Roosevelt who had the idea of an American state highway system. The four-lane divided roads in Germany known as autobahns were used as the model for interstate highways in America. Their construction began in the 1950s under the administration of Pres. Harry Truman. Drivers loved them, but small towns suffered as they were bypassed.

Georgia Ports Authority | Fast Forward

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A trip to any mall will give you a look at thousands of items that weren’t created down the street. Many of them were imported from distant lands. And the Georgia Ports Authority in Savannah…the 4th largest port in the country…is the point of entry for, quite literally, tons of them. The Georgia Ports Authority has a job for just about any interest. They’re governed by logistics and driven by technology—technology that you might be able to learn by…playing video games? You’ll want to see this.

Which Comes First, Hydrogen-Powered Cars or the Fueling Stations?

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Learn about the cars of tomorrow and hydrogen power with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from May 21, 2014. After spending more than a decade and billions of dollars on developing zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, carmakers are planning to release their models in California. But despite the state’s large demand for cars and tough air quality standards, California lacks a network of fueling stations.

Old Red Trail | Construction Changes

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Early road construction was time-consuming and expensive.  In 1959, road crews could lay out one mile of road a day at best. With today’s technology and equipment, paving and grading roads is much easier and faster.  Construction of bridges required specialists who could design the river-spanning lengths.  In the 1960s, road construction cost $400,000 per mile of four-lane highway, including the cost of land, equipment, workers’ pay, bridges, and materials.  Today, roads cost more than four times that for two lanes in one direction, but they last 50% longer

America Revealed | Clear Skies

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Support your History, Geography, and Science curriculum with this video which takes a close look at how policy and technology improvements in the planning and procedure of air traffic control systems can guide the future of air transportation. Then, use the accompanying lesson plan, "Crowded Skies: Imagining the Future of Air Transportation," to have students write proposals for improving the state of transportation in the United States.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Engineering the Jet Age

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Trace the emergence of the passenger jet from its military origins and learn about the obstacles and opportunities that Boeing’s president Bill Allen faced taking the company into the jet age, in this video from WGBH and The Documentary Group. After World War II, Boeing relied on sales of the B-47 bomber to keep the company afloat. This plane, which flew nearly 600 miles per hour at 35,000 feet, inspired Allen to conceive of a future in which commercial airline passengers would fly in jets. A decade after the close of World War II, Boeing delivered the 707. Within a year, more travelers were crossing the Atlantic by air than by sea. This resource is part of the Aerospace Engineering Collection.