Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - ELA (X) - Animals (X)

Giggle, Giggle, Quack

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In this hilarious sequel to Click, Clack, Moo, Cows That Type, Farmer Brown’s animals pull their old tricks on Farmer Brown’s brother, Bob.

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Grade Level: 
Primary
Length: 
00:09
Giggle, Giggle, Quack

Dot the Fire Dog

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Dot is a Dalmatian who lives in a fire station. Sometimes she plays catch with one of her firefighter friends, while others play games, read a book, or cook spaghetti.

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Grade Level: 
Primary
Length: 
00:10
Dot the Fire Dog

Joey Runs Away

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JOEY RUNS AWAY is the story of a little kangaroo who lives in his mother’s pouch. The pouch is referred to as "Joey’s room," furnished and filled with all of Joey’s belongings.

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Grade Level: 
Primary
Length: 
00:08
Joey Runs Away

Officer Buckle and Gloria

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Officer Buckle travels from school to school, giving children tips and advice on how to keep safe. The trouble with Officer Buckle’s speeches is that they are just too boring!

Grade Level: 
Primary
Length: 
00:12
Officer Buckle and Gloria

The Tale of the Mandarin Ducks

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A greedy lord captures the drake to enjoy its beautiful plumage, separating a pair of inseparable mandarin ducks.

Grade Level: 
Primary
Elementary
Length: 
00:16
The Tale of the Mandarin Ducks

Seabiscuit: An American Legend (Unabridged)

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Seabiscuit was one of the most electrifying and popular attractions in sports history and the single biggest newsmaker in the world in 1938, receiving more coverage than FDR, Hitler, or Mussolini. But his success was a surprise to the racing establishment, which had written off the crooked-legged racehorse with the sad tail. Three men changed Seabiscuit's fortunes:

Grade Level: 
Lexile: 
990L
Length: 
13:14
Seabiscuit: An American Legend (Unabridged)

Nasal Spray May Be Lifesaver for Snake Bite Victims

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Snakes! Show your students how applied science works with this PBS NewsHour story on treating snake bites from June 19, 2014. Although snake bites are rarely fatal in the United States, every year about 100,000 people die worldwide after being bitten by venomous snakes. A California doctor has developed a nasal spray treatment that halts paralysis before they reach a hospital.

Pourquoi Stories | Jakers!

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This video segment from Jakers features a storyteller who tells a Pourquoi story about a spider. Pourquoi is the French word for "why". Pourquoi stories try to explain in an entertaining way why something happens or why things are the way they are, especially in nature. This lively story is about Anansi the Spider, a popular character in African folklore. We hear an imaginary tale that tries to explain why the lowest part of a spider's body is so big. Could it really be because of the plan the greedy spider Anansi came up with to eat two feasts in one day?

Puppy Walker

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In this segment from Zoom into Action, Brett trains puppies to be seeing-eye dogs. He volunteers as a puppy walker for the Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind. He is working with a puppy named Arty for one year. His job is to socialize Arty and teach him to follow commands. At the end of the year, Brett has to bring Arty back for more training so he will be ready to work with a person who has a visual imparity. Brett knows his work is for a very good cause. When it’s time to give up the puppy, he isn’t too disappointed.

Trackers

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This WILD TV segment introduces John Stokes, and some friends, who are a part of the Tracking Project in New Mexico. A tracker reads the prints on the ground made by an animal or person. Mr. Stokes teaches us how to be trackers in this clip. To be a tracker, you must move slowly, be very quiet, and stay downwind of whatever you are tracking. We also learn how to make a tracking stick, which can help get even more information.

Historic Relationships Between Dogs and Humans

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In this video segment from Nature, we learn that dogs were the first creatures to be domesticated. Ancient people thought of dogs as creatures of magic and as spiritual guardians. Dogs were often sacrificed and buried with people to protect them with their magical powers. In Mexico today, hairless Xolo (SHOW-low) dogs are believed to heal pain. Around the world dogs are useful to people for protection because of their bark, which acts as an alarm and can intimidate strangers. Barking dogs are a stronger deterrent for burglars than a burglar alarm.

Animal Shelter Photographer

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In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

The Sled Dogs of the Arctic Circle | Nature

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In this Nature video, we learn how the Inuits of the Arctic Circle rely on their dogs. Existing on a diet of snow and seal blubber (fat), these dogs pull the sleds of the Inuits and protect them from wild animals. Multiple dogs pull together to maintain the stability of the sled. Sled dogs sometimes run the equivalent of five marathons (5 x 26.2 miles = 131 miles) per day. They will be the first to fall through the ice if there is a crack, but they recover from the cold plunge quickly. The dogs have evolved to master the harsh environment.

The Hunting Dogs of Papua New Guinea

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This video from Nature describes the history and uses of the dogs of Papua New Guinea. Men from the Akepangi tribe set out to hunt at dawn. They believe the dogs they take with them have supernatural abilities to track down prey. The dogs are called the singing dogs because they howl but do not bark. In the hunt, the dogs find an opossum in the canopy (upper layer of vegetation). The dogs are more valuable to the hunters than their bows and arrows. The tribe believes the dogs tell them where the evil spirits lie in the jungle.

Social and Historical Perspectives of Dogs

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In this video segment from Nature, learn about the evolution of dogs. More than 750 million people share their lives with dogs today. This video explores theories of how dogs became a domestic pet. One theory is ancient people tamed wild wolves. This theory is challenged by the idea that wolves evolved themselves into a different species. Biologist Raymond Coppinger believes human garbage heaps may have caused wolves to be drawn to feed on them. Competition among the wolves may have caused them to transform into "dogs,” that were not frightened of humans who came to the dumps.

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