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Quake! Disaster in San Francisco, 1906

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Copies: 30

Buildings were weaving in and out. The street pitched like a stormy sea. Bricks were raining down all around him. The ground shook with such violence that Jacob thought the world had come to an end.

Lexile: 
770L
Quake! Disaster in San Francisco, 1906

Predicting Earthquakes

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Copies: 1

The San Francisco Earthquake

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Copies: 1

The San Francisco Earthquake is a thorough examination of the April 18, 1906, earthquake that is considered one of the first environmental disasters of the modern age. Striking California's Bay Area, the quake and its resulting fires destroyed a rapidly growing, prosperous city and left more than 500 people dead, thousands homeless, and $500 million worth of property damage.

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1906 San Francisco Earthquake

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Copies: 1

A huge earthquake rocked the West Coast on April 18, 1906. Worst hit was the city of San Francisco, where buildings collapsed and fires raged for days. Thousands of people died, and many more were left homeless. The disaster was just one of a long series of earthquakes triggered by the San Andreas Fault. It taught scientists valuable lessons about preparing for earthquakes.

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Bulu

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Copies: 7

Born on a crocodile farm in Zambia's untamed South Luangwa Valley, the puppy seemed different from his littermates. Too quiet. Unresponsive. Terriers are usually full of energy and bouncing off walls. But not this one. Nobody wanted him. Enter Anna and Steve Tolan-former police officers who had left behind their life in England to live in the African bush. People thought the Tolans were a bit different, too. The peculiar puppy suited them perfectly. They named him Bulu, or "wild dog" in the local Nyanja language.

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Lexile: 
700L
Bulu

The Mighty Mars Rovers

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Copies: 7

On June 10, 2003, a little rover named Spirit blasted off on a rocket headed for Mars. On July 7, 2003, a twin rover named Opportunity soared through the solar system with the same mission: to find out if Mars ever had water that could have supported life.A thrilling addition to the acclaimed Scientists in the Field series, The Mighty Mars Rovers tells the greatest space robot adventure of all time through the eyes—and heart—of Steven Squyres, professor of astronomy at Cornell University and lead scientist on the mission.

Lexile: 
950L
The Mighty Mars Rovers

A Walk in the Rain Forest

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Copies: 1

Take a walk in the rain forest. It's hot and humid and humming with life. Look up into the dense canopy of leaves above you. Tangled vines lead to the treetops, where parrots squawk and monkeys swing from branch to branch.

A Walk in the Rain Forest

The Skull in the Rock

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Copies: 7

In 2008, Professor Lee Berger--with the help of his curious 9-year-old son--discovered two remarkably well preserved, two-million-year-old fossils of an adult female and young male, known as Australopithecus sediba; a previously unknown species of ape-like creatures that may have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. This discovery of has been hailed as one of the most important archaeological discoveries in history. The fossils reveal what may be one of humankind's oldest ancestors.

Lexile: 
1140L
The Skull in the Rock

Eruption! Volcanoes and the Science of Saving Lives

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Copies: 7

After more than a century of peaceful dormancy, the volcano Nevado del Ruiz in Columbia, South America, erupted. Blistering clouds of searing volcanic gases and ash flash-melted huge amounts of snow, launching a towering wall of hot mud toward the village of Armero. People ran - but they couldn't outrun the onslaught, and 23,000 perished.

Lexile: 
1000L
Eruption! Volcanoes and the Science of Saving Lives

Stronger than Steel

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Copies: 7

They have a touch so feather-light, it can barely be felt on human skin. The vividly gold and black colored golden orb weaver spider is the largest web-making spider on the planet. These elegant and efficient arachnids can weave impressive webs up to three feet wide in less than an hour. And these spiders' silk-spinning abilities could have far-reaching implications for science and medicine.

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Lexile: 
860L
Stronger than Steel

When the Earth Shakes: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsunamis

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Copies: 6

Earthquakes,
volcanoes,
tsunamis.
Headline-making natural disasters with devastating consequences for millions of people. But what do we actually know about these literally earth-shaking events?

New York Times bestselling author, explorer, journalist, and geologist Simon Winchester—who’s been shaken by earthquakes in New Zealand, skied through Greenland to help prove the theory of plate tectonics, and even charred the soles of his boots climbing a volcano—looks at the science, technology, and societal impact of these inter-connected natural phenomena.

When the Earth Shakes: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsunamis

How Nothing Became Everything: The Mystery of Life

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Copies: 6

How did nonliving atoms evolve into modern people? Find out in this engaging illustrated exploration of how nothing became everything.

The science of evolution is a topic of utmost importance, especially as the focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education continues to increase. Fortunately, important doesn’t have to mean boring. From explaining how scientists discovered how life began on earth to speculating about whether space aliens are carnivores, this engaging investigation of all things evolution is infused with fun as well as facts.

How Nothing Became Everything: The Mystery of Life

Smart and Spineless: Exploring Invertebrate Intelligence

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Copies: 6

Wise old owls? Problem-solving dolphins? Maybe you have heard of Koko the gorilla, who has mastered one thousand signs in American Sign Language, or Chaser the border collie, who recognizes one thousand names for her stuffed toys.

But what about ants building megacolonies or bees reporting to the hive about new nesting sites? What about escape artist octopuses and jellyfish that use their eyes (they have twenty-four!) to navigate? Are insects, spiders, and other animals without backbones considered smart, too?

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Smart and Spineless: Exploring Invertebrate Intelligence

Inside Biosphere 2

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Copies: 6

Biosphere 2 was built nearly thirty years ago to develop technologies for human living in space and on other worlds. Eight biospherians survived sealed inside the engineered ecosystem for two years. The results of the mission were mixed, but they definitely succeeded in constructing a research facility like none other in the world.

Lexile: 
1060L
Inside Biosphere 2

Breakthrough: How Three People Saved "Blue Babies" and Changed Medicine Forever

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Copies: 6

On a cold day in November 1944, eighteen-month-old Eileen Saxon was brought into an operating room at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She could barely breathe, and he lips and fingertips had turned a dusky blue, the result of a heart condition known as blue baby syndrome. Most doctors who had seen her expected her to die within hours.

Author: 
Lexile: 
1170L
Breakthrough: How Three People Saved "Blue Babies" and Changed Medicine Forever

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