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A Typology and Nomenclature for New York Projectile Points

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THIS IS PART OF THE PREHISTORIC IROQUOIS CURRICULUM KIT

An archaeological reference book for identifying various stone projectile points found throughout New York State. Revised in 1971. Original 1961 text can be found online here: New York State Museum

Iroquois Crafts

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Before the intrusion of the White Man, the people of the five tribes or nations (later, six) which comprised the League of the Iroquois controlled much of the lands in the vicinity of Lake Ontario. Sometime in the sixteenth century, the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas founded a lasting confederation which later became an example for the federal Constitution and which persists to the present day. In 1722, the five were joined by the Tuscaroras from the south and became then known as the Six Nations.

Iroquois Crafts

The Iroquois

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Describes the history, social structure, and customs of the People of the Longhouse.

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The Iroquois

Earth Maker's Lodge: Native American Folklore, Activities, and Foods

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Arranged by region, this illustrated collection includes stories, legends, poems, and traditional craft projects of Native American peoples from the Arctic to Mexico. The glossary will help students understand the various peoples and their languages. Winner of the 1995 Book Builder's of Boston Award for Excellence in Graphic Arts.

Earth Maker's Lodge: Native American Folklore, Activities, and Foods

Return of the Sun: Native American Tales from the Northeast Woodlands

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Native American author and teacher Joseph Bruchac has collected 26 tales from Northeast tribes in this book. Some are gentle and humorous, like "Sunny Wundy's Skipping Stone", about a boy who outwits a stone giant. Others, like "The Origin of Medicine", are darker in tone.

Return of the Sun: Native American Tales from the Northeast Woodlands

New Voices from the Longhouse

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An anthology of contemporary Iroquois writing, edited by Joseph Bruchac.

New Voices from the Longhouse

Children of the Longhouse

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Eleven-year-old Ohkwa'ri and his twin sister must make peace with a hostile gang of older boys in their Mohawk village during the late 1400s.

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950L
Children of the Longhouse

Iroquois Voices, Iroquois Visions: A Celebration of Contemporary Six Nations Arts

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Collection of poetry, prose, and pictures by contemporary Iroquois people.

Iroquois Voices, Iroquois Visions: A Celebration of Contemporary Six Nations Arts

Legends of the Iroquois

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Tehanetorens is a master story teller in the Mohawk tradition. In Legends of the Iroquois ancient stories are presented both in pictographs and with an English translation. The text is beautifully supported with illustrations by the accomplished Iroquois artist Kahionhes. The legends carry us deep into a Native American culture and teach basic lessons about what it means to be a human being.

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Legends of the Iroquois

Hiawatha: Founder of the Iroquois Confederacy

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For some 600 years, Hiawatha has been revered among the Iroquois people as a hero of mythic proportions. His greatest accomplishment lay in founding the Iroquois Confederacy, a league of nations that stresses cooperation, peace, and unity.

In the time of Hiawatha, the Iroquois--comprising the Onondaga, Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, and Seneca nations--were embroiled in numerous conflicts, both internal and external. Saddened by the violence, Hiawatha used his great oratory skills to try to convince his people to stop warring. ...

Hiawatha: Founder of the Iroquois Confederacy

The Iroquois

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The Iroquois traditionally lived in what is now upstate New York, subsisting on wild plant foods, game, and fish from the area's fertile forests and teeming waterways, along with corn, beans, and squash. Long ago the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca tribes formed the League of the Five Nations. Despite its ideal of cooperation, the League was fearsome in war as it attempted to extend its rule. In the 16th century, the League challenged other Indian groups for access to European traders and their goods, siding first with the French, then with the Dutch and English.

The Iroquois