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Science (X) - Physical Science (X) - Streaming (X)

Pitch: Super Sounding Drums

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The construction of a drum -- the materials it is made of, its size and shape, and the tension of its top, or drumhead -- all affect how the drum sounds. In this video segment, two members of the ZOOM cast create drums of different sizes, shapes, materials, and tensions, and compare the results.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Balloon Brain: Designing a Helmet

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As humans, we thankfully have more going for us than the balloon brains depicted in this video segment adapted from ZOOM. Still, the failed efforts of some of the ZOOM cast members to design adequate protection for their balloon brains illustrates the importance of wearing a proper helmet and protecting your own brain whenever you skate, rollerblade, ski, or ride a bike.

Triangles: Designing a Newspaper Chair

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Once it's been read, there's often little more to do with the daily newspaper than to add it to that towering stack of recyclables we collect each week. In this video segment, however, the ZOOM cast demonstrates how innovative design can turn this otherwise flimsy material into a relatively solid piece of furniture.

Becoming Green Energy Experts

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This Michigan State University/Lansing Boys and Girls Club partnership demonstrates the powerful result of giving youth the science background and tools they need to carry out investigations of their own design, and to communicate their knowledge in their own voice.

Traveling Through Time

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Is it possible to travel through time? Einstein’s theory of relativity states that the stronger the gravitational pull on an object, the more time slows for that object. Scientists predict that if someone were to travel to a place with a lot of gravity, like near a black hole, time would pass more slowly for that person. In this video excerpt from NOVA’s "The Fabric of the Cosmos: The Illusion of Time," host and theoretical physicist Brian Greene takes a journey through space—and time—to illustrate what time travel might really be like.

Scale City: Greetings from Sky-Vue Drive-In

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Greetings from Sky-Vue Drive-In takes students on a tour through the history of drive-in theaters and a visit to one that's still open and thriving in Winchester, Kentucky. Looking at shadows through the drive-in movie projector introduces the relationship of a shadow's size to its distance from the light source.

The Odds of Finding Life and Love | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Join Joe Hanson, host of It's Okay to Be Smart, as he explores Enrico Fermi's paradox of why we haven't crossed paths with any extraterrestrials, and then uses Frank Drake's equation to estimate the number of civilizations that might exist in our galaxy. Finally, we'll meet a young lady named Ann and see if we can calculate how many special someones there might be out there for her. It's a cosmic love story!

Brewing the Perfect Cup

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Every blend of coffee has a unique mixture of variables that must be solved for. Watch a small business describe the algebra behind importing, roasting, packing and distributing coffee beans.

A - Z Overview

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Watch and learn how to explore career options from A to Z with the Lab Squad kids as they meet and interview career professionals.

Scale City | Proportions and Music in the Real World

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In this video—through footage of the calliope aboard the Belle of Louisville, a church pipe organ, and various instruments at a recording studio—students are introduced to the mathematical concept that the length of a musical pipe or a string has a proportional relationship with the sound it produces.  In the accompanying activity, stringed instruments are used to demonstrate the concept presented in the video. This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School Collection.

Quantum Cryptography Explained | Physics Girl

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With recent high-profile security decryption cases, encryption is more important than ever. Much of your browser usage and your smartphone data is encrypted. But what does that process actually entail? And when computers get smarter and faster due to advances in quantum physics, how will encryption keep up?

Points of Origin

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This animation from KET illustrates how an origin is used for positive and negative measurement along a straight line and on a flat plane. It also shows how an origin, latitude, and longitude identify locations on Earth and explores how measuring temperature differs from measuring height or weight.

Lifting with Levers

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In this video segment from Cyberchase, Jackie, Matt, and Inez try to move a stack of slabs blocking a doorway. They decide to use a long board as a lever, but they soon realize they need a longer board in order to move the heavy slabs. The problem is that they are not sure exactly how long the lever should be. Since they do not have the time to try out levers of varying lengths, Inez decides to construct a scale model. While testing their model levers, they learn about the relationship between the length of a lever and its lifting capability.

A Slice of Pizza Science! | It's Okay to Be Smart

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How does math keep a folded slice from drooping? And what does pizza have to do with the speed of light?

Predicting the Angle of a Bouncing Ball

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In this Cyberchase video segment, the CyberSquad is trapped in a cave. Inez and Digit have the key to escape, but there is an enormous block of ice in their way. In order to get the key to Jackie and Matt, who are on the other side of the cave, the CyberSquad decides to slide the key along the ice until it bounces off the cave wall and travels to the other side. Since they do not want to risk losing the key, they decide to use a small model. While testing the various aiming points, the CyberSquad learns about angles of reflection.

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