Streaming

Science (X) - Fine Arts (X) - Streaming (X)

Dem Bones

Icon: 
DVD icon
Icon: 
Streaming icon

This colorful and musical video combines the catchy tune of a traditional African American spiritual with interesting facts about the bones in the human body..

Author: 
Grade Level: 
Primary
Length: 
00:08
Dem Bones

Nutrition and You (2007)

Icon: 
DVD icon
Icon: 
Streaming icon
Icon: 
Teacher's Guide icon

This DVD contains four 20-minute segments:

Nutrition Basics:

Grade Level: 
Middle
Length: 
01:20
Nutrition and You

Scale City: Greetings from Sky-Vue Drive-In

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Greetings from Sky-Vue Drive-In takes students on a tour through the history of drive-in theaters and a visit to one that's still open and thriving in Winchester, Kentucky. Looking at shadows through the drive-in movie projector introduces the relationship of a shadow's size to its distance from the light source.

Career Connections | Tire Designer

Icon: 
Streaming icon

A tire designer uses art, math, and engineering to create safe, cost-effective tires.

Analyzing its Geometry and Energy Efficiency | Treasures of New York: "Hearst Tower"

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Students solve a real-world mathematical problem involving the area of a triangle and learn about how energy conservation is applied to architectural design using video from Treasures of New York: Hearst Tower. Utilizing text-dependent discussion questions and classroom activities called “teaching tips,” students have an opportunity to take a deep dive into mathematics, STEM content and the arts.

Scale City | Proportions and Music in the Real World

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video—through footage of the calliope aboard the Belle of Louisville, a church pipe organ, and various instruments at a recording studio—students are introduced to the mathematical concept that the length of a musical pipe or a string has a proportional relationship with the sound it produces.  In the accompanying activity, stringed instruments are used to demonstrate the concept presented in the video. This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School Collection.

ZOOM | Pitch: Making Guitars

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Vibrations are the basis for all sound. Controlling the frequency of sound-producing vibrations is the key to creating and playing musical instruments. In this video segment adapted from ZOOM, two cast members demonstrate how to make guitars out of boxes and rubber bands, as well as how the sounds these instruments make can be manipulated.

Mixing Colors | Everyday Learning

Icon: 
Streaming icon

What color do you get when you mix blue and yellow? Children learn about mixing two colors to create a new color in this original animated video from KET.

The World's Largest Salamander | Songs for Unusual Creatures

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The Chinese Giant Salamander is the largest amphibian on the planet, reaching lengths of up to six feet. In this episode, join host Michael Hearts as he travels to the Los Angeles Zoo to meet a Chinese Giant Salamander, and then perform a song inspired by this unusual creature.

ZOOM | Experimenting with a Glass Xylophone

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The cast investigates how the pitch of sound changes when they strike a variety of glasses filled with different amounts and types of liquids in this video segment adapted from ZOOM. When you hit an empty glass with a spoon, both the glass and the air inside it vibrate. You hear these vibrations as sound through the air.

Glass Frog | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Q: What do the GLASS FROG and the GLASS ARMONICA have in common? A: They're both in this video from Songs for Unusual Creatures in association with PBS Digital Studios! The glass frog is called so because it has see-through skin on its stomach! How crazy is that? You can see just about all of its inner organs, including its beating heart. The glass armonica, on the other hand, is one of the rarest and most exotic musical instruments and it was invented by Benjamin Franklin! Join Michael on a visit to the "Frog Pod" at the Atlanta Botanical Garden and then check out Michael Hearst's friend Cecilia Brauer play a tune for the glass frog on a glass armonica.

 

Episode 210 - Blossom and Snappy Go to the Zoo, Part II | Count On It!

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Blossom and Snappy help Robbie prepare for her math class by drawing pictures of animals that her students will be able to sort. But in order to find out what certain animals look like, Blossom and Snappy visit the zoo again.

Hunting For Tardigrades! | Songs for Unusual Creatures

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Guess which animal can survive temperatures of 300 Fahrenheit, -400 degrees, and withstand 1000x more radiation than any other animal on the planet? The Honey Badger? Wrong! It's the tardigrade (aka water bear). In this episode, host Michael Hearst hunts for this microscopic creature in Virginia.

ArtQuest: Science and Art

Icon: 
Streaming icon

MTSU professors Michael Baggarly, Kim Dummons & Jarrod Houghton create a bronze sculpture using science.

Music | What's Good

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Venture into the private studios of music producers Peter Cottontale and Thelonius Martin to see how they work. Music is scientific: sound is produced when something vibrates, and those vibrations are brought to the ear as sound waves. Learn about the science of sound and discover how good vibes can move you and your kids.

For use at home with your children, see our Science of Music and Sound Lesson Plan!

Pages