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Homo Sapiens Versus Neanderthals

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Explore the origins of modern humans. Fossil evidence from Middle East caves and elsewhere has revealed some competitive advantages modern humans, known as Homo sapiens, are believed to have held over the more archaic human species, Neanderthals. For example, during the time in which the two species may have coexisted, Homo sapiens lived on high ground, from which they could survey the landscape and plan their hunting expeditions. Some scientists have theorized that the success of this strategy may have contributed to the demise of the valley-dwelling Neanderthals, who became extinct about 30,000 years ago. Adapted from NOVA.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Biotechnology: Upstream Processing Associate

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In this video excerpted from Pathways to Technology, you’ll learn about the role biotechnology plays in the fight against cancer. Roya Dirin is an upstream processing associate who works with cells, looking for proteins that can help treat cancer. Her first career was as a midwife, but she decided to switch fields because she wanted to help cure diseases. Roya explains how her community college biotechnology degree is just the first step in her new career.

Turtle Defense

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In this video from the WPSU’s series Outside, a staff member from Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center at Penn State University explains how some species of turtle protect themselves in their environment. Turtles, like many other species, are facing obstacles that threaten their survival. Some of these obstacles have threatened turtle survival for centuries, while others have emerged more recently and are caused by human activities.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Animal Families | Everyday Learning

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Families are our introduction to society. By living and growing within a small connected group, we are prepared for encounters with larger groups within society. Animal families provide a great example of similarities and differences within various family groups. This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Wolf Research | Science Trek

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This video segment from IdahoPTV's Science Trek shows the process a research biologist goes through to trap, measure and put a radio collar on wolves.

Taste Test Video

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This DragonflyTV segment demonstrates the relationship between taste and smell, and the ability of taste buds to recognize taste when the nose is blocked.

A - Z Overview

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Watch and learn how to explore career options from A to Z with the Lab Squad kids as they meet and interview career professionals.

GPS: Baby Maiasaura

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This DragonflyTV segment follows two Montana girls as they learn how paleontologists find fossils, and how they use the fossils to determine how old the dinoaur was when it died.

SciGirls | Dolphin Dive 06: Analyze

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The SciGirls have finished collecting all their observations and are now totaling their data and organizing them into a graph to see if they can make some conclusions about whether or not the dolphins can recognize themselves in a mirror.

Cyberchase | Patterns in Nature

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In this video segment from Cyberchase, Bianca wants to learn why her plants keep dying, so she transports them in a carriage to the New York Botanical Garden. A helpful plant expert shows her some patterns in plants, including bilateral and rotational symmetry, before discovering the pattern that may be killing Bianca's plants.

The World's Largest Salamander | Songs for Unusual Creatures

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The Chinese Giant Salamander is the largest amphibian on the planet, reaching lengths of up to six feet. In this episode, join host Michael Hearts as he travels to the Los Angeles Zoo to meet a Chinese Giant Salamander, and then perform a song inspired by this unusual creature.

Glass Frog | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

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Q: What do the GLASS FROG and the GLASS ARMONICA have in common? A: They're both in this video from Songs for Unusual Creatures in association with PBS Digital Studios! The glass frog is called so because it has see-through skin on its stomach! How crazy is that? You can see just about all of its inner organs, including its beating heart. The glass armonica, on the other hand, is one of the rarest and most exotic musical instruments and it was invented by Benjamin Franklin! Join Michael on a visit to the "Frog Pod" at the Atlanta Botanical Garden and then check out Michael Hearst's friend Cecilia Brauer play a tune for the glass frog on a glass armonica.

 

Episode 210 - Blossom and Snappy Go to the Zoo, Part II | Count On It!

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Blossom and Snappy help Robbie prepare for her math class by drawing pictures of animals that her students will be able to sort. But in order to find out what certain animals look like, Blossom and Snappy visit the zoo again.

Hunting For Tardigrades! | Songs for Unusual Creatures

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Guess which animal can survive temperatures of 300 Fahrenheit, -400 degrees, and withstand 1000x more radiation than any other animal on the planet? The Honey Badger? Wrong! It's the tardigrade (aka water bear). In this episode, host Michael Hearst hunts for this microscopic creature in Virginia.

The Incredible True Story of the Blobfish | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

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The blobfish was recently declared "The World's Ugliest Animal!", but is that really fair? Even if the blobfish is less attractive that some of its fishy cohorts, does that make it any less lovable? Let's take a closer look at how this unusual creature became an overnight celebrity. While we're at it, how about a musical boxing match performed on two of the lowest-pitched instruments -- tubax and contrabassoon?

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