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Science (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - Streaming (X)

Maintaining a Healthy Body (2010)

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Maintaining a healthy body is a fundamental part of leading a fulfilling, successful life. This video program highlights many of the basic things everyone can do to maintain a safe and healthy lifestyle.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
0:20
Maintaining a Healthy Body

Investigating the Immune System (2010)

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This video explores the wide range of defense mechanisms the body calls upon to fight foreign invaders in an effort to maintain health. Immune responses, diseases, and care of the immune system are some of the topics addressed.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
0:20
Investigating the Immune System

Nutrition and You (2007)

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This DVD contains four 20-minute segments:

Nutrition Basics:

Grade Level: 
Middle
Length: 
01:20
Nutrition and You

Antibiotics (2005)

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Perfect for high school science and social studies classes, this 13-part series includes interviews with leading experts and shows students how to analyze facts before forming opinions.

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Length: 
00:24
Antibiotics

Becoming Green Energy Experts

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This Michigan State University/Lansing Boys and Girls Club partnership demonstrates the powerful result of giving youth the science background and tools they need to carry out investigations of their own design, and to communicate their knowledge in their own voice.

Teen Fights for Toxic Waste Cleanup

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New York student Shadia Wood tells how she became an environmental activist in this video adapted from Earth Island Institute’s New Leaders Initiative. Wood lives near several toxic waste sites and was concerned to learn that the New York Superfund—the money set aside for cleaning such sites in her state—had gone bankrupt. Working with other students and environmental groups, Wood lobbied the New York legislature for eight years until the Superfund program was refinanced. Environmentalist Laura Haight says that this law was the most important environmental law passed in New York State in a decade.

A - Z Overview

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Watch and learn how to explore career options from A to Z with the Lab Squad kids as they meet and interview career professionals.

DIY: How to Walk a Tightrope

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In this presentation, Big Apple Circus performer Sara Schwarz shows students interested in the art of tightrope walking how to get started. She discusses daily routines, balance-optimizing exercises, the physics involved in successfully walking the tightrope, and the dedication required to master this art.

Can You Follow This Beat? | BrainCraft

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Does the beat always beat you? In this episode, we explore tone deafness, Amusia, and why some people can't hear music.

Three Mile Island Cooling Towers

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In this Building Block video from Frontline: Nuclear Reaction, the four cooling towers at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant dot the horizon at sunrise. Smoke billows from the two towers on the left. The Susquehanna River lies in the foreground.

Adopting Sustainable Food Practices

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This video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College looks at how the traditional subsistence practices of indigenous people were once sustainable, unlike today's lifestyles. Most foods are now produced and transported using methods that can damage the environment and contribute to climate change.

Producing Penicillin

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This video segment adapted from A Science Odyssey tells how two scientists, Howard Florey and Ernst Chain, used the research findings of Alexander Fleming to turn a natural compound, penicillin, into an effective treatment for bacterial infections. Their tests in mice and later in human patients demonstrated penicillin's ability to cure such infections. After U.S. drug companies figured out how to mass-produce penicillin, its reputation as a "miracle drug" was established. Spurred by public support, medical research and development consequently took off.

Big River: A King Corn Companion | Farm Nitrates in the Water Supply

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Learn how farm runoff impacts water quality and human health. Tour the water treatment plant in Des Moines, Iowa, and learn how the water is filtered, in this video excerpted from the independent film Big River: A King Corn Companion. Hear how high nitrate content in water can affect human health, causing such problems as blue baby syndrome, and understand why water treatment plants in agricultural regions need nitrate removal facilities because of the pollution from fertilizer runoff.

Contaminating the Rockies

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Learn how abandoned mines have been contaminating water supplies in the Rocky Mountains in this video from NOVA: Poison in the Rockies. Beginning in the 1850s, prospectors dug deep mines in the Colorado Rockies in search of precious metals. Today, more than 15,000 abandoned metal mines have filled with acidic water that carries away heavy metals like lead, cadmium, and zinc into mountain streams. In small quantities, some metals are essential to life, but in larger quantities they are toxic. Some newer mines include safeguards to make them more environmentally sound.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Eradicating Malaria with DDT

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Discover the story of Dr. Fred Soper and his efforts to eliminate malaria in this video segment adapted from Rx for SurvivalDr. Soper targeted the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, the species known to spread malaria. He devised a strategy that included destroying breeding sites and controlled spraying of a pesticide known as DDT. The video explains why Soper's global campaign ultimately stalled, before it reached the African continent, and why DDT was almost uniformly banned from use. The video concludes with some experts suggesting that it may be time to reconsider using DDT to save African lives.

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