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Social Studies (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - U.S. History (X) - Safety (X) - Streaming (X)

Posting Pictures Online

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Posting a picture on the Internet only takes a second, but a photo is forever on the Internet. It is easy for someone to copy and paste a photo from one website to another. Once a picture is posted, it is virtually impossible to get it back.

Adults You Know and Trust Can Help You

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Sometimes we see something on the Internet that makes us feel uncomfortable. When this happens, you need to tell an adult you trust. An adult you trust might be your mom and dad, guardian, older brother or sister, teacher, school counselor, principal, police officer, grandparent, uncle or aunt. But, even people you trust can do something that could make you feel uncomfortable. If this happens, you need to talk to another trusted adult.

In Case of Emergency, Please Dial... (How Police Train Immigrants for Emergencies)

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Not knowing local laws and emergency response procedures can be a serious problem. That’s why the Metropolitan Police Department of the City of St. Louis conducts safety meetings at the International Institute of St. Louis to help bring immigrants up to speed on local procedures, including when to dial 911. It’s also helpful for officers to establish a relationship with the community and clear up any misconceptions about police that immigrants may bring from their home countries.

League of Denial: Should Kids Play Tackle Football?

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Learn how children's brains are affected differently by hits to the head that routinely occur during football practice and game play in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is also featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids? Use the lesson to learn more about the hypothesis that "just playing the game" places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. For background on CTE, watch Introduction To CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: What Causes CTE?

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Learn about one scientist’s hypothesis that “just playing the game” places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids. Use the lesson to learn more about how children's brains are impacted differently and to write down your responses to evidence that football may be unsafe for young children. For background on CTE, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: Introduction to CTE

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Learn how the 2002 death of one of football’s greatest linemen helped bring to light a rare disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. In 1991, "Iron Mike" Webster retired after 17 years in football and thousands of hits to his helmet. Soon after, he and his family suspected that playing football had taken a devastating toll on his brain. After Webster died, pathologist Bennet Omalu examined Webster’s brain tissue. His findings suggested that repetitive brain trauma causes an abnormal protein ("tau") to accumulate in the brain. This was the first evidence that playing football could cause a progressive neurodegenerative disease that results in permanent brain damage. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: Short-Term Effects of Concussions

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Learn about the damaging short-term effects of concussions suffered by professional football players, through the story of Dallas quarterback Troy Aikman, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. During the 1994 NFC championship game, a defensive player's hit to Aikman’s helmet knocked Aikman out of the game. In the hospital, Aikman was visited by his agent, who had to repeatedly explain what had happened in the game. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

FRONTLINE: NFL Concussion Settlement | How Much Is a Brain Worth to the NFL?

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Learn about the formula used in the NFL concussion settlement to pay injured players, in this video short from FRONTLINE. Under the settlement, a player’s brain could be worth as much as $5 million or as little as nothing. In 2013, negotiators representing the NFL and former players came up with a plan to pay ex-players with a qualifying condition. The plan factored in the player’s age, the seriousness of the illness, and how long he played, and might cost the NFL about $1 billion in payouts to former players. The league makes $1 billion each year in sponsorship revenues alone. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial Update | NFL Player Quits over Concussion Concerns

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Learn about NFL player Chris Borland, who retired after just one season due to his concern about concussions, and why his decision prompted one media outlet to call him “the most dangerous man in football,” in this video from FRONTLINE. Borland left professional football, the game he loved since childhood, after reading about the effects of repeated head contact on the brain and speaking with a leading brain scientist. In response to the young star’s headline-making retirement decision, NFL commissioner Goodell stated the game was safer than ever. Estimates from actuaries hired by the NFL state that three out of ten NFL players will have brain damage in their lifetimes. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Download teacher support materials for this resource:  Teaching Tips  |  Video Transcript

League of Denial: The NFL Plays Defense

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Discover the strategies that the National Football League used to avoid admitting that playing professional football can cause chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in this media gallery from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. After a study commissioned by the NFL showed a higher-than-expected prevalence of brain disorders among football players, the league’s spokesman claimed that the study’s design was flawed, and its commissioner would not acknowledge before Congress that concussions hurt pro football players. And even after a large financial settlement awarded former NFL players hundreds of millions of dollars, the league made no admission of guilt. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Do Active Shooter Drills Do More Harm Than Good? | Above the Noise

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As active shooter drills become more common in schools, there’s debate over what type of drill is best. Do hyper realistic drills better prepare students, or are they unnecessarily traumatizing? Join students from PBS NewsHour’s Student Reporting Labs as they investigate which kind of drills are most effective. Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Oakland Sideshows: Should They Be Legal? | Above the Noise

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What do you get when you mix car stunts, youth culture and Oakland? Sideshows! In the Bay Area, illegal sideshows divide the community. Supporters say sideshows are part of Oakland culture and advocate for safe venues. Opponents view sideshows as disruptive and dangerous. Even if you’re not from Oakland, there’s likely a clash between car culture and cops near you. What do you think? Should communities embrace car culture events like sideshows, or should they remain banned? 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Roll Red Roll | Lesson Plan Clips

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When you witness an injustice, remaining silent or acting as a bystander is an active choice that is an impediment to justice. Speaking out and taking action are the counterpoints. The modern Civil Rights Movement would not have had the impact it did without thousands of individuals who spoke out and acted nonviolently to gain equal treatment under the law. More recently, the #MeToo movement’s power stems from individuals choosing to name and hold accountable those who perpetrate sexual harassment and violence. In both examples, the key factor in overcoming oppression and exploitation is breaking silence in the face of injustice.

In this lesson students will have the opportunity to examine the consequences of remaining silent specifically in relation to sexual violence and rape. Classrooms will watch curated segments from the acclaimed documentary Roll Red Roll, analyze in small groups a variety of perspectives involved in the case and identify moments when silence could have been broken. Students will then look at individuals who did intervene as model upstanders and reflect by writing proactive and prosocial steps they can each take to prevent, intervene, inform others and work toward ending sexual violence and rape culture.