Streaming

Social Studies (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - Middle (X) - Above the Noise (X) - Streaming (X)

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

Is Your Fleece Jacket Polluting the Oceans? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

By 2050, the World Economic Forum predicts that the amount of plastic in the oceans will outweigh ALL the fish. When you hear “plastic” pollution, you might picture six-pack rings wrapped around seagulls or beaches littered with plastic bottles. But now, researchers are discovering a new menace -- microfibers. They're tiny strands of synthetic fibers that come from the synthetic clothing that many of us love to wear -- think fleece jackets and yoga pants. Find out what we can do about microfiber pollution in this week's Above the Noise video.

Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Above the Noise host Shirin Ghaffary weighs the potential health risks of drinking energy drinks, and compares them to other sugary, caffeinated beverages. Energy drinks are a billion dollar industry and their popularity keeps growing despite health concerns. We are warned they are particularly dangerous for children and teens -- and there have even been reports of deaths linked to energy drink consumption. In this video we take a closer look at the science to see if energy drinks are really as bad as the hype, and what it is about them that has doctors concerned.

How Widespread Is Student Homelessness? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Student homelessness in the US is a tricky thing to quantify. HUD -- the federal government's Department of Housing and Urban Development -- controls most of the money used to help the homeless. But, that agency misses about 4 in 5 homeless students. Why? It’s all about how you define the term “homeless”. According to HUD, you’re only considered homeless if you’re living in a shelter or living on the streets. But according to the Department of Education, about 80% of the 1.3 million homeless students living in the US are couch surfing, living in motels, or doubling up with family or friends. These students aren’t eligible for HUD money, so increasingly, it’s up to schools to provide help. Host Myles Bess explores how homeless students get the help they need when different federal agencies use competing definitions to define who’s homeless.

Should Sexting Be a Crime? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Numerous research surveys and school scandals indicate that teens are engaging in sexting, and as technology and trends rapidly change, it’s hard for parents, schools and the law to create rules around this behavior. Watch the latest Above the Noise video to help students discuss the tricky issue of sexting.

Is Your Social Status Making You Sick? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Financial inequality has been in the news a lot recently. It was the rallying cry for the Occupy Wall Street movement that began back in 2011, and it was at the center of Bernie Sanders’ campaign when he ran for president. This inequality creates what is typically called a social status ladder, with rich people at the top and poorer people toward the bottom. Research shows that your position on the ladder is actually one of the most powerful predictors of health. But it’s so much more than just how much money you have or how fancy your education is. It’s how you feel you compare to other people -- your subjective social status. We’ve scoured the research, looking at human and animal studies, to find out how your subjective social status actually affects your health.

Is Marijuana Actually Medicinal? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

With the results of the 2016 election, use of medical marijuana is now approved in 28 states, plus Washington, D.C., but the plant itself is not approved as medicine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It still remains federally illegal. Under the Controlled Substances Act, the federal government classifies marijuana as a schedule I drug-- which is a category reserved for the most dangerous drugs, drugs that do not show any medical benefit. This classification makes it difficult for researchers to study, because drugs in this category are very tightly regulated. Host Myles Bess explores the research surrounding medical marijuana and discusses some of the challenges researchers face in studying it.

Homework in High School: How Much Is Too Much? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

It’s not hard to find a high school student who is stressed about homework. Many are stressed to the max — juggling extracurricular activities, jobs and family responsibilities. It can be hard for many students, particularly low-income students, to find the time to dedicate to homework. So students in the PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs program at YouthBeat in Oakland, California are asking what’s a fair amount of homework for high school students? Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Suicide Prevention: How Can Schools Help? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

No one wants to talk about it, but suicide is a leading cause of death among teens. The good news is, schools are uniquely positioned to help. Student reporters from PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs investigate what schools can do. 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Do Active Shooter Drills Do More Harm Than Good? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

As active shooter drills become more common in schools, there’s debate over what type of drill is best. Do hyper realistic drills better prepare students, or are they unnecessarily traumatizing? Join students from PBS NewsHour’s Student Reporting Labs as they investigate which kind of drills are most effective. Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Oakland Sideshows: Should They Be Legal? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

What do you get when you mix car stunts, youth culture and Oakland? Sideshows! In the Bay Area, illegal sideshows divide the community. Supporters say sideshows are part of Oakland culture and advocate for safe venues. Opponents view sideshows as disruptive and dangerous. Even if you’re not from Oakland, there’s likely a clash between car culture and cops near you. What do you think? Should communities embrace car culture events like sideshows, or should they remain banned? 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

School Dress Codes: When Do They Go Too Far? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

On social media, conversations about #Imnotadistraction are gaining popularity, and school dress codes are coming under fire from students who say these policies can be sexist and racist. But many argue strict dress codes are necessary for a safe learning environment. So, how should schools decide on dress code policies? Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

The accompanying lesson plan asks students to explore the pros and cons of dress code policies in light of the national conversation, as well as their own school. 

Why Isn't There More Research about Gun Violence? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

As political issues go, gun control is definitely a doozie. Few topics get Americans as riled up. But no matter where you stand, most of us can at least agree on this: that gun violence claims the lives of too many innocent people in this country, and actions should be taken to reduce the number of people killed. Compared to other wealthy nations around the world, the rate of gun deaths in the U.S. is high. So why isn’t there more government-funded research about the problem, the way there is for other major public health crises? Why is the rate of gun violence in the United States higher than in any other wealthy nation? Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Should Schools Suspend Suspensions? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Suspensions have some unintended consequences. They disproportionately target minorities, and some students who get suspended are more likely to repeat a grade, drop out of school and become involved in the criminal justice system. But suspensions are viewed by some as a necessary tool to keep schools safe. It may not be great for the suspended student, but they say it’s more important to keep everyone else at the school safe. Should suspensions be suspended? Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Should Colleges Still Require the SATs and ACTs? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Taking the SAT or ACT is a right of passage for high school students applying to college. Millions of juniors and seniors take at least one of the tests every year, albeit reluctantly, and most colleges still require it to be considered for admission. But a growing number of colleges are putting much less emphasis on test scores. Many have made the test entirely optional. Should tests like the ACT or SAT still be used for college admissions? Find out in the latest Above the Noise episode. And join the discussion about standardized testing with other students on KQED Learn by going to Activity in Support Materials. (Log in required.)