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Environmental Justice in Dallas

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Follow a Dallas community's fight to receive federal Superfund status to clean up the damage from a high-polluting lead smelter in this video segment adapted from Earthkeeping: "Toxic Racism." Hear from a reporter from the National Law Journal who explains some of the health effects of lead exposure and how after a cursory cleanup of a lead smelter site in West Dallas, the community was ignored, despite warnings from the Centers for Disease Control about elevated blood lead levels. Meet Luis Sepulveda, a community member who organized the West Dallas Coalition for Environmental Justice, which eventually succeeded in having the site win Superfund status.

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

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In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

Environmental Justice: Opposing a Toxic Waste Landfill

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In this video segment, adapted from Earthkeeping: Toxic Racism, learn about the beginning of the environmental justice movement. Meet various experts and leaders who describe the issues of environmental racism and justice, and learn about the watershed event—the controversy over the location of a toxic landfill in Warren County, North Carolina—that brought the issues to national attention in the early 1980s. See footage of the residents protesting the transport of PCB-contaminated soil to their community, and hear about how the incident triggered further investigations into the relationship between communities of color and toxins.

Teen Maps Contaminants from a Coal Plant

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Meet Marisol, a high school student from Little Village in Chicago in this video adapted from Earth Island Institute. Hear about how she volunteered within her community and found out about the toxins produced by the local coal-burning power plant. Learn about some of the health risks associated with such pollution, and observe how she helped create OurMap of Environmental Justice, an interactive online map that includes videos, facts, and descriptions of toxic pollutants in the community.

In Case of Emergency, Please Dial... (How Police Train Immigrants for Emergencies)

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Not knowing local laws and emergency response procedures can be a serious problem. That’s why the Metropolitan Police Department of the City of St. Louis conducts safety meetings at the International Institute of St. Louis to help bring immigrants up to speed on local procedures, including when to dial 911. It’s also helpful for officers to establish a relationship with the community and clear up any misconceptions about police that immigrants may bring from their home countries.

Life. Support. Music: What Role Should Government Play in Paying for Health Care?

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Classrooms can use Crigler's powerful story to raise issues about U.S. health care reform, especially topics related to long-term care.

Healthy School Lunch Menus Spark Political Food Fight

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Use the debate about healthy school lunch rules to show students how Congress works and spark a discussion with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from May 30, 2014. The 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act required schools to use more wholesome ingredients and set fat, sugar and sodium limits. But Republican lawmakers have proposed a one-year waiver, arguing that students won't eat the new offerings or that schools can't afford them.

Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Law Subsidies

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See how President Obama responded to the Supreme Court's decision to uphold his health care law with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 25, 2015.

Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad? | Above the Noise

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Above the Noise host Shirin Ghaffary weighs the potential health risks of drinking energy drinks, and compares them to other sugary, caffeinated beverages. Energy drinks are a billion dollar industry and their popularity keeps growing despite health concerns. We are warned they are particularly dangerous for children and teens -- and there have even been reports of deaths linked to energy drink consumption. In this video we take a closer look at the science to see if energy drinks are really as bad as the hype, and what it is about them that has doctors concerned.

Chris Rock Discusses Integration in Baseball | Ken Burns & Lynn Novick: Baseball - The Tenth Inning

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Comedian Chris Rock and others discuss affirmative action, home runs, and integration in baseball.

Santa Fe Study Guide: Have School Shootings Become Part of American Culture? | PBS NewsHour

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Watch the first video, Remembering the Santa Fe Shooting Victims, to learn about the eight students and two teachers who were killed in the school shooting at Santa Fe High School on May 18, 2018 near Houston, Texas. Next, read the Associated Press (AP) story about the circumstances surrounding the shooting and answer the discussion in support materials questions below.

Then, watch the second video, Texas School Shooting Days Before Graduation Draws Governor’s Call for New Gun Laws. Consider how the words spoken by student Paige Curry relate to those spoken in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

May 22, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Shmuly Yanklowitz's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Shmuly Yanklowitz is an intellectual rabbinical student at New York City's Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School and a passionate activist. A Modern Orthodox Jew, he feels compelled to break boundaries, to resist becoming an old-style rabbi stuck within the walls of the synagogue.

FRONTLINE: Prison State | Kentucky’s Prison Overhaul

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Explore how our reliance on prison to solve social problems is creating a national crisis, and how the state of Kentucky is trying to respond, in this video adapted from FRONTLINE: Prison State. Kentucky spends more than $15 million each year incarcerating people from one Louisville housing project, Beecher Terrace. One juvenile justice commissioner suggests that we are incarcerating young people merely for their poor performance in school, problems in the home, or their unwanted behavior. A law professor states that we have invested in incarceration instead of in systems designed to help people stay out of jail and prison. In just over a decade, Kentucky’s prison growth rate jumped by 45 percent and spending by almost 220 percent—to nearly half a billion dollars. This prompted reform that includes the early release of nonviolent offenders in order to save money. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE collection.

Republican Health Care Bill Faces Opposition from within Party | PBS NewsHour

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Republican lawmakers introduced their replacement for former President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA) this week, but face opposition from both Democrats and members of their own party as they push to move the bill through committee and into the U.S. House of Representatives for a vote. 

March 10, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

How Gold Star Families Became a Political Issue | PBS NewsHour

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For the sake of time, we recommend stopping the video at 3m:23s.

President Donald Trump continues to face criticism for a condolence call to the Gold Star family of Sgt. La David Johnson, a Special Forces soldier recently killed in Niger. Gold Star Families are the relatives of US military members who died in battle. There was a time when a political leader would never politicize the death of a service member or question a grieving family, said Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report. “It’s a little bit like the customer’s always right. Right? The grieving family is always right in this case,” she said. Walter added this was no longer the case after Trump criticized the Khan family, a Gold Star family, after they spoke out against him at the Democratic National Convention.

October 25, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

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