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Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - Social Studies (X) - Life Science (X) - Streaming (X)

Adopting Sustainable Food Practices

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This video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College looks at how the traditional subsistence practices of indigenous people were once sustainable, unlike today's lifestyles. Most foods are now produced and transported using methods that can damage the environment and contribute to climate change.

Ebola in the News | Second Ebola Diagnosis Shows Danger for Health Workers

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During the 2014 Ebola outbreak in Western Africa, PBS NewsHour interviewed registered nurse Katy Roemer and history of medicine Professor Howard Markel on the dangers of Ebola for U.S. health workers.

Use this collection of news stories and resources from the PBS NewsHourto understand the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa.

Water Pressures | Get Involved in Your Water Future

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Water Pressures documents a partnership between desert villagers in water-scarce Rājasthān, India and students at Northwestern University, to talk about the present water crisis and the future of water around the world.

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

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In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

Food, Inc.: The Dollar Menu

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In Food, Inc., filmmaker Robert Kenner lifts the veil on our nation's food industry, exposing the highly mechanized underbelly that's been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government's regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA. In this clip, a family compares the cost of eating fast food to healthier options at the grocery store. Students should discuss the economics of the food industry and how the cost of foods affects their choices.

Sidelined: Sports Concussions

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Find an explanation of what causes concussions and learn how computer software can assess damage due to a concussion. Also learn how neuroscientists use digital imaging to monitor long-term brain trauma. A QUEST video produced by KQED. An Educator Guide is included in support materials.

Clean Water Systems in Mexico

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In this video segment adapted from Rx for Survival, learn about the importance of clean water and sanitation systems. Hear the story of how, in the early 1990s, Mexico's entry into a North American trade agreement was threatened by a cholera epidemic. Find out how the Mexican government rebuilt the water and sanitation system to stop the spread of the disease and how the investment in clean water helped the country win the trade agreement.

Water Pressures | Students in India

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Follow a group of Northwestern University students as they live in the villages of Rajasthan, India and experience a water crisis firsthand, in this video clip from Water Pressures.

Water Pollution Investigation

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Water pollution is the contamination of water resources by harmful wastes or toxins. This type of pollution can be dangerous to animals and plant populations in and around lakes, rivers, polluted groundwater areas or oceans, and can pose major problems for humans as well. Explore the detrimental effects of plastic waste pollution on the San Francisco Bay—specifically, mercury contamination, with this resource group from QUEST.

League of Denial: Should Kids Play Tackle Football?

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Learn how children's brains are affected differently by hits to the head that routinely occur during football practice and game play in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is also featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids? Use the lesson to learn more about the hypothesis that "just playing the game" places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. For background on CTE, watch Introduction To CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

What Are Viruses? | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 3

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Explore how viruses grow and spread, starting first with a host organism. The more species a single virus can occupy, the more likely it is to last into the future. The strain of Ebola that terrorized West Africa does an especially effective job of infecting the human body.

Zika Transmission | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 6

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Zika, unlike Ebola, is less commonly spread by human-to-human contact. Instead, mosquitos are the root cause. Brazil has recently implemented mosquito controls to prevent the transmission several of viral diseases, including Zika. As the world's population grows and spreads geographically, human interaction with new wildlife opens up greater opportunity for zoonotic disease to spread.

A New Foe Emerges - Nipah | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 7

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In 1988 Southeast Asia faced it's own battle with Nipah, a fruit bat-borne disease that kills more than three quarters of those infected. Nipah is only contracted in Bangladesh between the months of December and March, and this was a puzzle at first. It turns out that it is during these months that date palm sap, a national delicacy, is collected. Fruit bats, too, drink this sap, and the sap is thus the vehicle of Nipah transmission. Jonathan Epstein monitors bats in Bangladesh in an effort to prevent Nipah from becoming a global pandemic.

How Ebola Kills | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 4

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Meet Alhassan Kemokai, an Ebola virus survivor from Sierra Leone, as he tells the story of his battle with the brutal disease. Kemokai caught Ebola while caring for his mother when she contracted the virus. For this reason, some call Ebola a disease of love: it transmits while people care for their ailing loved ones. 

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