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LITERALLY OUR MOST AMAZING EPISODE EVER!!! | PBS Idea Channel

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"This is literally the best episode of Idea Channel EVER." Is it? Or are we just continuing the cultural trend of hyperbole? (side note: the episode is pretty gosh darn enjoyable) It's like EVERY SINGLE THING people describe is AWESOME and AMAZING and THE BEST. We're all seemingly competing to have the ultimate meaningful experiences, so how are we supposed to articulate genuine sentiment? I mean it's THE WORST I cannot even. Literally, I can't even find words to accurately describe the limits to our vocabulary and our ability to express true enthusiasm. So where does our vernacular develop from here? 

Coffee, Mesmerism, and Morning Routines | PBS Idea Channel

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This episode is about glorious morning coffee. Or, more specifically, about our time-tested morning routines. Everybody has their morning routine that they rely on and cling to dearly. The simple acts of brewing coffee, showering, and whatever else you do makes that first act of climbing out of bed easier. The comfort and familiarity of those repeated actions give us a sense of ownership, and cause us to self identify with these simple set of actions. So what is it about these routines that make them so important to us? Watch the episode to find out, and tell us what you think!

What Do Hot Sauce Labels Say About America? | PBS Idea Channel

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Peppers are the essence of hot sauce, and hot sauce is the essence of spicy. You might be a hot sauce lover, but how much thought have you given to their labels? If you've ever taken a second to examine them, you might notice some patterns and similarities amongst them. What does this say about Americans' attitude towards hot sauces, or even towards food in general? 

May 10, 2018 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about Summer health, a name change for Boy Scouts, the 2018 National Teacher of the Year, Central American asylum seekers, science fighting food-borne illnesses, NASA's Mars InSight launch, the Golden Gate Bridge restoration, the Kentucky Derby, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for grades 4-8. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an FYI segment.

The French Family | The Homefront

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Learn about the challenges of the military lifestyle for kids in this clip from The Homefront. Army Colonel Jeffrey French, his wife Kathy, and their three children Kyle (20), Sarah (19) and Annemarie (13) are currently stationed at the Army War College in Carlisle, PA—their eleventh duty station. For the kids, these moves have meant leaving friends and changing schools frequently—as many as nine, in Kyle's case. While deployed to Afghanistan in 2009-2010, Jeff's unit suffered many casualties, and several of its soldiers were found guilty of war crimes. Despite this challenging period, the Frenches remain committed to the Army—particularly their son, Kyle, who is following in his father's footsteps and is now a third year cadet at West Point.

It Wasn't Called PTSD | Iwo Jima: From Combat to Comrades

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Iwo Jima was an unusual battle even by WWII’s tough standards. The 8-square mile island had nearly 100,000 combatants on it. In 36 days, 28,000 men died protecting or seizing this piece of volcanic rock…thousands of Japanese are still entombed there. Four out of every five men who fought on this island would either be killed or wounded. Battlefield ghosts stalk both American and Japanese survivors.  Although it was not called PTSD in 1945, it was just as destructive a condition. The men who fought on Iwo Jima describe how they coped after the war. And one fighter pilot describes the unexpected family event that brought him redemption. 

Transfusion | Knocking Film Module

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This clip follows the Thomas family as they struggle to obtain a bloodless liver transplant for their son Seth. It examines the complexities of medical decision-making as family and physicians try to follow religious beliefs and save a young man’s life. Medical ethicists reflect on the Witness’s role in obtaining advancements in treatment that may benefit many people.