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Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - Life Science (X) - Streaming (X)

A - Z Overview

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Watch and learn how to explore career options from A to Z with the Lab Squad kids as they meet and interview career professionals.

Can You Follow This Beat? | BrainCraft

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Does the beat always beat you? In this episode, we explore tone deafness, Amusia, and why some people can't hear music.

Adopting Sustainable Food Practices

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This video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College looks at how the traditional subsistence practices of indigenous people were once sustainable, unlike today's lifestyles. Most foods are now produced and transported using methods that can damage the environment and contribute to climate change.

Producing Penicillin

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This video segment adapted from A Science Odyssey tells how two scientists, Howard Florey and Ernst Chain, used the research findings of Alexander Fleming to turn a natural compound, penicillin, into an effective treatment for bacterial infections. Their tests in mice and later in human patients demonstrated penicillin's ability to cure such infections. After U.S. drug companies figured out how to mass-produce penicillin, its reputation as a "miracle drug" was established. Spurred by public support, medical research and development consequently took off.

Eradicating Malaria with DDT

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Discover the story of Dr. Fred Soper and his efforts to eliminate malaria in this video segment adapted from Rx for SurvivalDr. Soper targeted the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, the species known to spread malaria. He devised a strategy that included destroying breeding sites and controlled spraying of a pesticide known as DDT. The video explains why Soper's global campaign ultimately stalled, before it reached the African continent, and why DDT was almost uniformly banned from use. The video concludes with some experts suggesting that it may be time to reconsider using DDT to save African lives.

Cleaning Poop from Drinking Water | Engineering Is

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How can engineering improve the lives of millions of people? The people of Bangladesh were getting really sick because of the bacteria that they were getting from their water, which was untreated and dangerous. Amy Pickering decided that there must be a simple solution to that problem. She designed a contraption that attaches to the water pump that the Bangladeshi people were getting their water from. It killed the bacteria by distributing a small amount of bleach into the water supply. This is an effective solution because it is cheap and takes advantage of how the people are already getting their water. With some research and a simple device, Pickering saved millions of people from diseases that come from drinking and using dirty water. 

Ebola in the News | Second Ebola Diagnosis Shows Danger for Health Workers

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During the 2014 Ebola outbreak in Western Africa, PBS NewsHour interviewed registered nurse Katy Roemer and history of medicine Professor Howard Markel on the dangers of Ebola for U.S. health workers.

Use this collection of news stories and resources from the PBS NewsHourto understand the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa.

What a Tooth Reveals About Autism | Braincraft

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How did the stem-cells drawn from children's teeth help us understand the key to autism?

Antiobiotic-Resistant Superbugs: The Empire Strikes Bacteria! | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, with millions of infections reported every year and thousands of deaths. How does antibiotic resistance work? How did we get here? And what can we do in the future to make sure that papercuts don't spell a death sentence?

The Decreasing Effectiveness of Antibiotics

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Explore the public health implications of increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics, in this video from FRONTLINE: Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria. Two doctors explain that, while antibiotics have helped protect people from infections since becoming widely available after World War II, this unique class of drugs is losing its effectiveness from overuse. The more exposure bacteria have to an antibiotic, the more likely they will develop resistance to the antibiotic. Because as much as half of all antibiotic use in the United States is either unnecessary or inappropriate, more and more people may die of infections that were once easily treatable. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE collection.

Water Pressures | Get Involved in Your Water Future

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Water Pressures documents a partnership between desert villagers in water-scarce Rājasthān, India and students at Northwestern University, to talk about the present water crisis and the future of water around the world.

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

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In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

Food, Inc.: The Dollar Menu

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In Food, Inc., filmmaker Robert Kenner lifts the veil on our nation's food industry, exposing the highly mechanized underbelly that's been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government's regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA. In this clip, a family compares the cost of eating fast food to healthier options at the grocery store. Students should discuss the economics of the food industry and how the cost of foods affects their choices.

The Human Face of Big Data | Personalized Medicine

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We’re moving into a person-centric world where people and medical providers have access to genetic data. When a person's genome is sequenced, the known differences can help doctors predict their risk for disease, whether or not they are a carrier of a disease, and what their ancestry is. That data can point more directly to which treatments will work based on their genetic profile. Ultimately, this data could help medicine to move away from a treatment-based approach to a preventative model.

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