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Science (X) - Elementary (X) - Middle (X) - WNET (X) - Streaming (X)

Community Garden

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Orville Edwards, an urban naturalist, describes how community gardens can help improve the quality of life in the city. Vacant lots in a neighborhood in Brooklyn are converted into gardens. Edwards works in the largest community garden. Green spaces, like this garden, become a sanctuary for people living in a busy, congested city. They become spaces for people to relax, experience healthy living and socialize with neighbors in a positive way. In this video segment from WILD TV, Edwards shares his hopes that the garden space will be replicated across the United States to bring people together.

Squirrel Rehabilitation | WILD TV

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Mia rehabilitates squirrels in this segment from WILD TV. Mia’s mother is a state licensed animal rehabilitator. She rescues and takes care of orphaned or injured wildlife with the goal of returning them back to the wild when they are healthy and old enough to survive on their own. Mia and her mother do not get paid to do this. They do volunteer work because they care for animals. The video shows Mia feeding baby squirrels. However, to survive in the wild, the animals learn to be skittish of people and predators.

Trackers

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This WILD TV segment introduces John Stokes, and some friends, who are a part of the Tracking Project in New Mexico. A tracker reads the prints on the ground made by an animal or person. Mr. Stokes teaches us how to be trackers in this clip. To be a tracker, you must move slowly, be very quiet, and stay downwind of whatever you are tracking. We also learn how to make a tracking stick, which can help get even more information.

Wonderful Worms

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In this video segment from WILD TV, learn about 14-year-old Abigail Harden and her fascination with worms. She describes them as her first pets. She estimates there are about 50,000 worms in her local community garden. By eating organic matter, worms provide rich nutrients through their feces to help the plants grow. As they move through the soil they also provide aeration and drainage for the roots of the plants. Spreading fruit pulp around the plants to feed the worms draws them to the plants. The worms reproduce rapidly and hibernate in the winter by burrowing deep into the ground.

Help students differentiate between facts and opinions with the related lesson Facts or Opinions - Wonderful Worms.

Garden Spiders

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Although the brown recluse spider shares the garden with the famous black widow, did you know, of the two spiders, the brown recluse is more aggressive and more likely to bite? Or did you know the garden spider can easily handle prey larger than itself? In this video segment from Garden Insects, learn about six varieties of spiders that live in one garden. Of the six types, garden, black widow, brown recluse, wolf, crab, and jumping, each has its own unique characteristics and role to fulfill in a busy garden ecosystem.

Bee Swarm

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What you see in this video from Wild TV will amaze you! Wali, an actor, is working with an entomologist (insect expert) who is also a trained bee handler. With the entomologist's help, Wali picks up a bee cage that contains the queen bee of the colony. The worker bees swarm onto Wali’s hand while he is holding the queen bee’s cage. This shows one way that bee colonies work together in an organized way to survive.

Cloud the Horse: Foal

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In this video segment from Nature, cinematographer and narrator Ginger Kathrens brings her perspective to the lives of wild horses as she chronicles the growth and development of one young horse who she calls "Cloud." Cloud, a young foal, is only a few hours old. He walks with his mother in a band, or family, of wild horses for several miles uphill to the deep forest in the Arrowhead Mountains of Montana to reach their water supply. There are many obstacles to his survival, including mountain lions waiting in the shadows to pounce on the conspicuous light-colored palomino colt.

Nature | Stormy Seas

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This video from Nature illustrates the powerful impact of a volcanic eruption in Hawaii and traces the lava’s activity from cone to sea. The sea is the only natural substance that can stop a lava flow and it’s an explosive event. These explosions create littoral cones, or more simply, a newly-formed coastline. When the 80 degree water meets 2,000 degree lava, massive amounts of steam surge into the air, which can create miniature weather patterns. While the weather is localized, serious climatic changes like tornados can occur.

Ndakinna Wilderness Project | WILD TV

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The Ndakinna Wilderness Project focuses on wilderness skills, animal tracking, wilderness survival, native storytelling and culture, and nature awareness. In this video segment from WILD TV, a guide describes how to camouflage a person's body to avoid being detected in the wilderness. A group of young people camouflage themselves so they can get close enough to the animals to observe their natural behaviors.

Shelter Dogs: What Can You Do?

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Animal shelters euthanize animals when no one adopts them. After 7 days, if a lost dog’s owner doesn’t come pick up or rescue the dog, the shelter can euthanize it. In this video segment from WILD TV, Joyce, the narrator, says 26,000 dogs a year are picked up by the animal shelter. To help find homes Joyce, who is also a photographer, takes pictures of the dogs and posts the pictures on the Internet. She hopes people will see the dogs on the Internet and come to the shelter to adopt them. Joyce believes people can make a difference by doing something little.

Nature | Volcanic Views

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This video segment from Nature features Hawaii’s most notorious volcano, Kilauea. Over 10,000 years ago, Kilauea emerged from a hotspot on the ocean floor and began a journey that continues today. This active volcano has made The Big Island the largest in the Hawaiian island chain. In 1983, a vent called Pu’u O’o developed. When the vent erupts, red hot molten lava can explode 1,000 feet into the air, with a sound that is deafening.

Jarrod Studies Birds

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Jarrod Santora, professor at the College of Staten Island, is an ornithologist, a person who studies birds. In this segment from WILD TV, Jarrod describes his job. One of his responsibilities is to "band" or identify birds by putting a small bracelet around the birds' legs. Jarrod gets up before sunrise and spreads nets along bushes to safely catch birds. To get birds to go into the net, sometimes he will call them with whistles and noises, such as a screeching owl noise. Once birds are caught in the nets, he can carefully free them and band their legs. For more about the study of birds see, "An Ornithologist's Job".

Bees

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This video segment from WILD TV offers this daring look at bees, an often misunderstood insect. Mace Vaughan, an entomologist or expert on insects, teaches us about how bees swarm, the jobs of the queen and worker bees, how bees communicate with each other, and how the colony survives. Once you are instructed on how to move and act around bees, you won’t be stung. In fact, this video shows bees swarming on a man’s face. It is called a bee beard.

City Parrots

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Wild parrots have been spotted making homes and breeding in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens in New York City, on Long Island and in New Jersey. Although these are unlikely locations to find parrots, which typically make their homes in tropical environments, they have proven they are able to survive the cold winters in the northeastern United States. In this video segment from WILD TV, scientists and bird-lovers track and observe the parrots to determine how they are learning to survive in cities and suburbs.

Animal Shelter Photographer

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In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

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