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Cloud the Horse: Foal

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In this video segment from Nature, cinematographer and narrator Ginger Kathrens brings her perspective to the lives of wild horses as she chronicles the growth and development of one young horse who she calls "Cloud." Cloud, a young foal, is only a few hours old. He walks with his mother in a band, or family, of wild horses for several miles uphill to the deep forest in the Arrowhead Mountains of Montana to reach their water supply. There are many obstacles to his survival, including mountain lions waiting in the shadows to pounce on the conspicuous light-colored palomino colt.

Animal Shelter Photographer

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In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

Everglades: Pig Frog | WILD TV

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In this video segment from WILD TV, learn about the Florida Everglades, a giant wetland that is the habitat of many different species of animals. One of the animals featured in the video is the pig frog, named for the sound they make which is similar to a pig’s grunt. They contribute substantially to the ecosystem of the Everglades. Their permeable skin helps reflect toxins in the ecosystem. Scientists are studying pig frogs because they believe the frogs act as indicators of the health of the Everglades. They are an important part of the food chain that affects animals both far and near.

Documenting Change in Plants

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In this New York Voices segment, learn how plants can be used to help us learn about climate changes over time. For example, a warming trend can be determined by looking at samples that flower earlier and earlier each year. Scientists also conduct research on plants to find genes that are important for agriculture, food and medicine.

DNA Barcode Library

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Scientists use DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) barcoding to identify many varieties of plants. All living things have a unique DNA structure. While DNA is like a blueprint or recipe for an organism, barcoding is a numeric way of labeling something, similar to the way cashiers at supermarkets scan barcode products for prices. In this New York Voices segment, scientists collect plant materials from the 50-acre forest of the New York Botanical Garden and create unique barcodes to represent each plant_s DNA. This project is the first step in collecting samples to create a universal DNA barcode library of all of the genes of life.