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Science (X) - ELA (X) - Middle (X) - Elementary (X) - Life Science (X) - Streaming (X)

Community Garden

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Orville Edwards, an urban naturalist, describes how community gardens can help improve the quality of life in the city. Vacant lots in a neighborhood in Brooklyn are converted into gardens. Edwards works in the largest community garden. Green spaces, like this garden, become a sanctuary for people living in a busy, congested city. They become spaces for people to relax, experience healthy living and socialize with neighbors in a positive way. In this video segment from WILD TV, Edwards shares his hopes that the garden space will be replicated across the United States to bring people together.

SciGirls | Turtle Mania 04: Share

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Gathering data is but a portion of an inquiry investigation; the ultimate challenge is what to do with all that information. In this video clip from SciGirls: Turtle Mania, the girls gather up all the data from their turtle population study and basking platform test. They then interpret their observations, reach their conclusions and set about constructing a coherent and hopefully persuasive presentation. To truly get the most out of their investigation, it’s vital to remain open to new ideas even while sharing their final results.

Eating Healthy Foods

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Learn about the importance of eating healthy foods, in this video adapted from Media That Matters. A group of students present and explain the types of foods that are good for our bodies, the nutrients they provide, and how these benefit our bodies. They then explain what processed foods are, why some people like them, and why they are unhealthy.

Choosing Foods for Your Health

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Learn from Misty and Tim, two teens who have diabetes, about the food choices they make to help them control their condition, in these two video segments adapted from Living With MyType2. Misty is a college student learning to adapt her dietary needs to a new environment filled with options. Tim goes grocery shopping with his mother and explains how he identifies foods as healthy or unhealthy based on their ingredients and location in the store.

Squirrel Rehabilitation | WILD TV

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Mia rehabilitates squirrels in this segment from WILD TV. Mia’s mother is a state licensed animal rehabilitator. She rescues and takes care of orphaned or injured wildlife with the goal of returning them back to the wild when they are healthy and old enough to survive on their own. Mia and her mother do not get paid to do this. They do volunteer work because they care for animals. The video shows Mia feeding baby squirrels. However, to survive in the wild, the animals learn to be skittish of people and predators.

Trackers

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This WILD TV segment introduces John Stokes, and some friends, who are a part of the Tracking Project in New Mexico. A tracker reads the prints on the ground made by an animal or person. Mr. Stokes teaches us how to be trackers in this clip. To be a tracker, you must move slowly, be very quiet, and stay downwind of whatever you are tracking. We also learn how to make a tracking stick, which can help get even more information.

Wonderful Worms

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In this video segment from WILD TV, learn about 14-year-old Abigail Harden and her fascination with worms. She describes them as her first pets. She estimates there are about 50,000 worms in her local community garden. By eating organic matter, worms provide rich nutrients through their feces to help the plants grow. As they move through the soil they also provide aeration and drainage for the roots of the plants. Spreading fruit pulp around the plants to feed the worms draws them to the plants. The worms reproduce rapidly and hibernate in the winter by burrowing deep into the ground.

Help students differentiate between facts and opinions with the related lesson Facts or Opinions - Wonderful Worms.

Garden Spiders

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Although the brown recluse spider shares the garden with the famous black widow, did you know, of the two spiders, the brown recluse is more aggressive and more likely to bite? Or did you know the garden spider can easily handle prey larger than itself? In this video segment from Garden Insects, learn about six varieties of spiders that live in one garden. Of the six types, garden, black widow, brown recluse, wolf, crab, and jumping, each has its own unique characteristics and role to fulfill in a busy garden ecosystem.

Bee Swarm

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What you see in this video from Wild TV will amaze you! Wali, an actor, is working with an entomologist (insect expert) who is also a trained bee handler. With the entomologist's help, Wali picks up a bee cage that contains the queen bee of the colony. The worker bees swarm onto Wali’s hand while he is holding the queen bee’s cage. This shows one way that bee colonies work together in an organized way to survive.

Cloud the Horse: Foal

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In this video segment from Nature, cinematographer and narrator Ginger Kathrens brings her perspective to the lives of wild horses as she chronicles the growth and development of one young horse who she calls "Cloud." Cloud, a young foal, is only a few hours old. He walks with his mother in a band, or family, of wild horses for several miles uphill to the deep forest in the Arrowhead Mountains of Montana to reach their water supply. There are many obstacles to his survival, including mountain lions waiting in the shadows to pounce on the conspicuous light-colored palomino colt.

Wolong's Pandas

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In this video segment from Nature, learn about the endangered pandas of the Wolong Conservation Center in China. When the bamboo plant, the panda's main source of food, began to die off in the 1980s, the center responded by rescuing starving pandas from the wild. This resource includes an activity where students learn to compare and contrast information from multiple sources and a fun game that explores how changes in an animal’s food source can impact survival. Discussion questions challenge students to think about how climate change affects animal and plant life. To learn about China's panda population, see the "Bamboo Mountain" video segment of this two-part series.

For more resources like this, see the rest of the Human Impact on the Environment collection.

Shelter Dogs: What Can You Do?

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Animal shelters euthanize animals when no one adopts them. After 7 days, if a lost dog’s owner doesn’t come pick up or rescue the dog, the shelter can euthanize it. In this video segment from WILD TV, Joyce, the narrator, says 26,000 dogs a year are picked up by the animal shelter. To help find homes Joyce, who is also a photographer, takes pictures of the dogs and posts the pictures on the Internet. She hopes people will see the dogs on the Internet and come to the shelter to adopt them. Joyce believes people can make a difference by doing something little.

Disappearance of the Bees - What's the Impact?

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When Chinese farmers in South Sichuan Province, the largest producers of pears in that region of China, alerted the government to the absence of bees and that the year's crop was endangered, the government's unprecedented response was to insist on hand-pollination. Meanwhile, farmers in the United States, faced with the same dilemma, wonder if this method will someday, too, be their fate. This video segment adapted from Nature: Silence of the Bees discusses the impact of the bees' disappearance, as well as the effects Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has on pollination and the world food supply.

Jarrod Studies Birds

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Jarrod Santora, professor at the College of Staten Island, is an ornithologist, a person who studies birds. In this segment from WILD TV, Jarrod describes his job. One of his responsibilities is to "band" or identify birds by putting a small bracelet around the birds' legs. Jarrod gets up before sunrise and spreads nets along bushes to safely catch birds. To get birds to go into the net, sometimes he will call them with whistles and noises, such as a screeching owl noise. Once birds are caught in the nets, he can carefully free them and band their legs. For more about the study of birds see, "An Ornithologist's Job".

Bees

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This video segment from WILD TV offers this daring look at bees, an often misunderstood insect. Mace Vaughan, an entomologist or expert on insects, teaches us about how bees swarm, the jobs of the queen and worker bees, how bees communicate with each other, and how the colony survives. Once you are instructed on how to move and act around bees, you won’t be stung. In fact, this video shows bees swarming on a man’s face. It is called a bee beard.

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