Streaming

Elementary (X) - Middle (X) - Life Science (X) - Streaming (X)

Turtle Defense

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video from the WPSU’s series Outside, a staff member from Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center at Penn State University explains how some species of turtle protect themselves in their environment. Turtles, like many other species, are facing obstacles that threaten their survival. Some of these obstacles have threatened turtle survival for centuries, while others have emerged more recently and are caused by human activities.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Wolf Research | Science Trek

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from IdahoPTV's Science Trek shows the process a research biologist goes through to trap, measure and put a radio collar on wolves.

Taste Test Video

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This DragonflyTV segment demonstrates the relationship between taste and smell, and the ability of taste buds to recognize taste when the nose is blocked.

A - Z Overview

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Watch and learn how to explore career options from A to Z with the Lab Squad kids as they meet and interview career professionals.

GPS: Baby Maiasaura

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This DragonflyTV segment follows two Montana girls as they learn how paleontologists find fossils, and how they use the fossils to determine how old the dinoaur was when it died.

SciGirls | Dolphin Dive 06: Analyze

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The SciGirls have finished collecting all their observations and are now totaling their data and organizing them into a graph to see if they can make some conclusions about whether or not the dolphins can recognize themselves in a mirror.

Cyberchase | Patterns in Nature

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment from Cyberchase, Bianca wants to learn why her plants keep dying, so she transports them in a carriage to the New York Botanical Garden. A helpful plant expert shows her some patterns in plants, including bilateral and rotational symmetry, before discovering the pattern that may be killing Bianca's plants.

Glass Frog | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Q: What do the GLASS FROG and the GLASS ARMONICA have in common? A: They're both in this video from Songs for Unusual Creatures in association with PBS Digital Studios! The glass frog is called so because it has see-through skin on its stomach! How crazy is that? You can see just about all of its inner organs, including its beating heart. The glass armonica, on the other hand, is one of the rarest and most exotic musical instruments and it was invented by Benjamin Franklin! Join Michael on a visit to the "Frog Pod" at the Atlanta Botanical Garden and then check out Michael Hearst's friend Cecilia Brauer play a tune for the glass frog on a glass armonica.

 

The Incredible True Story of the Blobfish | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The blobfish was recently declared "The World's Ugliest Animal!", but is that really fair? Even if the blobfish is less attractive that some of its fishy cohorts, does that make it any less lovable? Let's take a closer look at how this unusual creature became an overnight celebrity. While we're at it, how about a musical boxing match performed on two of the lowest-pitched instruments -- tubax and contrabassoon?

Giant Anteater | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Join Michael Hearst from Songs for Unusual Creatures as he travels to the Nashville Zoo to visit the largest giant gnteater breeding facility in the United States. He might even get to feed an anteater named Mochila while he's there. By the way, did you know that giant anteaters walk on their knuckles to keep their claws sharp? 

A Song for the Sea Pig with The Kronos Quartet | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Who loves the Kronos Quartet? Who loves a sea pig? Now's your chance to see them BOTH in one video. It's a dream come true! But, wait, what in the world is a sea pig? Linda Kuhnz at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute can tell you all about it.

Magnapinna Squid | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

Icon: 
Streaming icon

"We were doing a dive with our remote vehicle off of Hawaii at about 4,000 meters ... and saw what looked like a rope hanging in front of the camera," says David Clague of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). "It turned out to be one of the arms of this gigantic squid! None of us had seen anything like it." Join Michael Hearst from Songs for Unusual Creatures as he visits David at MBARI in Moss Landing, CA to discuss the Magnapinna Squid. Then undulate along to spectacular footage of this unusual creature while music is performed on trumpet, trombone, and tuba.

Elephant Shrew | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

Icon: 
Streaming icon

It's true; it's true; there's an elephant shrew! Surprisingly, it's not related to the shrew at all. In fact, it's more closely related to manatees, aardvarks, tenrecs, and -- you guessed it -- elephants! Join Michael Hearst from Songs for Unusual Creatures as he visits the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, D.C. Then check out his band performing the song he came up with for these unusual creatures. 

Jesus Christ Lizard | Songs for Unusual Creatures | PBS Digital Studios

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Behold the Jesus Christ Lizard! People have given the common basilisk this name because of its amazing ability to run on water. This unusual creature inspired Michael Hearst from Songs for Unusual Creatures to compose a song for the toy piano and his friend Margaret Leng Tan was kind enough to play it.

Mark Catesby Explores New Worlds

Icon: 
Streaming icon

[00:29:37] Shorter edited version provided by the Catesby Commemorative Trust. In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

Pages