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A Different Kind of Fuel

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The increase in the world's population combined with declining fossil fuel supplies has created the need to develop an alternative form of fuel. In this video segment adapted from Curious, scientists are developing ways to create fuel using the earth's greatest energy supplier, the sun. In order to harness this energy, scientists are attempting to recreate photosynthesis and store the hydrogen fuel released during the process.

Nature | Crash: A Tale of Two Species - Horseshoe Crabs and Humans

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Learn about horseshoe crabs in this video from Nature. Horseshoe crabs spend most of their time, and are safest, on the ocean floor, but when it is time to spawn, they take a risk by coming to the surface to lay eggs. With the current moratorium imposed on fisherman using crabs as bait, they now harvest crabs for medical purposes and are then required to return them alive to Chesapeake Bay. Horseshoe crabs have blue blood containing a coagulant that detects minute levels of bacteria, forming a protective shield within the body akin to a "primitive antibiotic."

Cloud the Horse: Foal

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In this video segment from Nature, cinematographer and narrator Ginger Kathrens brings her perspective to the lives of wild horses as she chronicles the growth and development of one young horse who she calls "Cloud." Cloud, a young foal, is only a few hours old. He walks with his mother in a band, or family, of wild horses for several miles uphill to the deep forest in the Arrowhead Mountains of Montana to reach their water supply. There are many obstacles to his survival, including mountain lions waiting in the shadows to pounce on the conspicuous light-colored palomino colt.

Animal Shelter Photographer

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In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

Everglades: Pig Frog | WILD TV

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In this video segment from WILD TV, learn about the Florida Everglades, a giant wetland that is the habitat of many different species of animals. One of the animals featured in the video is the pig frog, named for the sound they make which is similar to a pig’s grunt. They contribute substantially to the ecosystem of the Everglades. Their permeable skin helps reflect toxins in the ecosystem. Scientists are studying pig frogs because they believe the frogs act as indicators of the health of the Everglades. They are an important part of the food chain that affects animals both far and near.

Documenting Change in Plants

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In this New York Voices segment, learn how plants can be used to help us learn about climate changes over time. For example, a warming trend can be determined by looking at samples that flower earlier and earlier each year. Scientists also conduct research on plants to find genes that are important for agriculture, food and medicine.

DNA Barcode Library

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Scientists use DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) barcoding to identify many varieties of plants. All living things have a unique DNA structure. While DNA is like a blueprint or recipe for an organism, barcoding is a numeric way of labeling something, similar to the way cashiers at supermarkets scan barcode products for prices. In this New York Voices segment, scientists collect plant materials from the 50-acre forest of the New York Botanical Garden and create unique barcodes to represent each plant_s DNA. This project is the first step in collecting samples to create a universal DNA barcode library of all of the genes of life.

Nature | American Eagle: Growing Independent

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This video from Nature features fledgling bald eagles along the Upper Mississippi River. It’s Fall, and the Mississippi is teeming with life. Water birds like the American coot are especially abundant this time of year—a welcome gift for the region’s bald eagles. Young eagles master the art of hunting and play with their spoils like it’s a game akin to rugby. Watching these majestic creatures soar through the air, it’s hard to imagine they were almost extinct a few generations ago.

Nature | Springs Eternal: Florida's Fountain of Youth - Life in Florida's Spring

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In this video from Nature, learn about the diverse life in Florida’s springs. Due to the warmth of the water, Florida’s springs teem with life from migrating sardines to mangrove snappers, a salt-water fish that cannot normally survive in fresh water. Migration to the water attracts various predators including eagles, osprey and alligators. As a life-or-death measure, the very gentle manatee takes refuge in the warm waters that rarely dip below 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

Jamaica Bay: Terrapin Predators

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In this Wild TV segment, scientists study raccoons and terrapins (turtles) in Jamaica Bay in New York City. Wildlife biologist Russell Burke describes the difficulty terrapins have raising their young. Although there are about 2000 nests per year on Jamaica Bay, predators like raccoons eat the terrapins' eggs. Scientists are studying the situation to find out what needs to be done. They are trying to find a natural solution that won't harm either species. They trap and track raccoons with radio collars to find out what their lifestyle is like. They also help protect the terrapin nests and hatchlings (newborn terrapins).

Why Moose Fight

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Ever wonder why moose fight? Explore the scene of one such animal throwdown in the wilds of Alaska with DIORAMA at The American Museum of Natural History. See the sights and hear the sounds of moose mating (yup, get ready for it) and find out who really calls the shots: the male moose or the female.

Nature | American Eagle: Hatching

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In this video from Nature, scientists watch newborn eaglets, or hatchlings, in their first days. Video footage from the nest itself offers a rare glimpse into the complex relationship between parent and offspring and how it evolves over time. Through the arduous first days, the young mother eagle must master a delicate approach and learn how to bond with her young eaglet. Fortunately, the male eagle is an experienced father—through his actions and behavior, it is clear he is very familiar with caring for hatchlings.

Nature | American Eagle: Fledglings

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This video from Nature reveals the practice young eagles need for flight and captures a maiden voyage into the air along the Upper Mississippi River. It’s summer when two young eagles begin their preparation—the male, named “Underdog,” appears to be more interested in flight than the female. Finally, Underdog takes to the air where he and other young eagles play with their parents and learn how to land, often the hard way.

Nature | Explorers of Yesterday and Today

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Explorer Tom Murphy braves a ground blizzard during a winter night in Yellowstone as seen in this video segment from Nature.

Nature | American Eagle: Challenges of Incubation

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It’s not easy being an eagle. This video from Nature illustrates the early stages of the egg incubation process for an eagle couple along the Upper Mississippi River. With help from an on site video camera, researchers can view the entire incubation period for two eagle eggs. During this period, the video footage captures the female eagle as she lays an egg, the careful nature of the male eagle with the young eggs, the quick response the parents have towards perceived danger, and how the couple copes with a deadly winter storm.

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