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What is a fractal (and why do they matter)? | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Fractals are complex, never-ending patterns created by repeating mathematical equations. Yuliya, a undergrad in Math at MIT, delves into their mysterious properties and how they can be found in technology and nature.

How to Make a Video Game

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Video games are fun to play, but have you ever wondered how to make one? Carmelo, a grad student in the MIT Media Lab, shows how anyone can start learning how to create video games by talking to machines through programming languages.

Start making at Scratch | MIT!

Engineering Trash into Treasure | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Folks at MIT's D-Lab are turning trash into treasure - specifically, trash to heat homes and cook in developing countries. It's not magic - it's engineering!

Could you make a robot with feelings? | Ask MIT

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"Could you make a robot with feelings?" Find out from Dr. Goren Gordon, a researcher in the Personal Robots Group in the MIT Media Lab!

Why We Fart | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Behind every fart (and poop) is an army of gut bacteria undergoing some crazy (and crazy useful) biochemistry. Learn what they have in common with beer brewing, and why we'd want to know about this science anyway...

What does the future of nuclear science look like? | Ask MIT

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"What does the future of nuclear science look like?" Find out from Sarah Don, a graduate student in Nuclear Science and Engineering and a senior operator at the MIT Nuclear Reactor.

Squid Skin with a Mind of Its Own | MIT's Science Out Loud

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When you cut the nerves from a squid brain to the skin, something unexpected happens with the tiny pouches of colored pigment, called chromatophores. Emily takes you behind this phenomenon, and how it can be explained and modeled on the computer with some surprisingly simple rules.

Growing Nanotube Forests | MIT's Science Out Loud

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What if we could grow elevators to space? Or make phones that last for weeks without a charge? These things could someday be possible someday with an amazing material like carbon nanotubes. Alex takes you behind the curious way researchers create this super-material.

Engineering River Cleanups | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Figuring out ways to clean up contaminated waters is a huge challenge. But luckily, a simple piece of plastic that mimics fish fat can help!

How Do Braces Work? | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Braces are a lot more barbaric - and awesome - than you might think. But they actually just copy the process that the rest of your bones naturally undergo! Andrea, an MIT Sloan Fellow, explains.

Could You Grow Wings on Your Back and Fly? | Ask MIT

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Jade and Lauren want to know if it's genetically possible to grow wings on your back and fly. Find out from MIT biologist, Dr. Sera Thornton!

Humanoid Robot Brains | MIT's Science Out Loud

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The smartest people in the world have spent millions on developing high-tech robots. But even though technology has come a long way, these humanoid robots are nowhere close to having the "brain" and motor control of a human. Why is that? Evan takes you behind the motor control processes in the human brain, and how cutting-edge research is trying to implement it in robots.

What is a Semiconductor? | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Semiconductors are in everything from your cell phone to rockets. But what exactly are they, and what makes them so special? Find out from Jamie, a Ph.D. student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.

How Do Ships Float? | MIT's Science Out Loud

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The technology that keeps huge cargo ships afloat is amazingly simple. PJ, a masters student in Naval Construction and Engineering at MIT, explains just how simple it really is.

Come Fare Un Videogioco | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Giocare ai videogiochi è divertente, ma vi siete mai chiesti come si fa a crearne uno? Carmelo, uno studente del MIT Media Lab, mostra come chiunque possa imparare a creare videogiochi, parlando ai computer attraverso i linguaggi di programmazione.

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