Economics

Middle (X) - PBS NewsHour (X) - Economics (X)

Consumers Speak Up on Net Neutrality

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Discover how the net neutrality debate could affect consumers with this video and educational materials from PBS NewsHour from September 15, 2014.

BMW Apprenticeship Paves Road to Unique Opportunities

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Introduce students to this apprenticeship program, which is a post-high school graduation option with the help of this PBS NewsHour video and questions from June 6, 2014. The BMW factory in Spartanburg, South Carolina, is luring youngsters with a scholars program that offers part-time work, an all-expenses paid associate's degree and near guarantee of a job and future education down the road.

‘Talking Cars’ Could Prevent Accidents Before They Happen

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In recent years, car companies have used technology to make cars safer. Now, the U.S. Department of Transportation is considering making features that were previously optional standard. One of these advances is automatic braking. Experts suggest that it could prevent accidents and save lives. Other technologies discussed include vehicle to vehicle communication and the "connected car".

Young Innovators Jumpstart Tech in Pakistan

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Find out how tech startups are changing Pakistan with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from May 25, 2015.

How Will Robots Affect Your Career Options?

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Find out how artificial intelligence could impact the future workforce with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from May 20, 2015.

Which Comes First, Hydrogen-Powered Cars or the Fueling Stations?

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Learn about the cars of tomorrow and hydrogen power with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from May 21, 2014. After spending more than a decade and billions of dollars on developing zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, carmakers are planning to release their models in California. But despite the state’s large demand for cars and tough air quality standards, California lacks a network of fueling stations.

Solar Energy Debate in Nevada Heats Up | PBS NewsHour

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Hear why solar energy has become a hot topic in sunny Nevada with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 27, 2016.

Facebook Mood Experiment Angers Users

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Help students understand the controversy over Facebook's psychological study of user behavior with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from July 2, 2014. Many Facebook users were upset by news that the social media network manipulated incoming content for hundreds of thousands of people without telling them. The manipulation was conducted for a study -- published in a respected scientific journal -- measuring how attitudes were affected by either positive or negative posts.

Water Worries, California’s ‘Water Cop’ Urges Residents to Take Drought Seriously with Mandatory Restrictions

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California is now in the third year of its worst drought since the 1970s. Help students explore the scale of the problem with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from July 17, 2014. Despite a drought emergency, consumption actually rose in May. But under new rules starting August 1, people who waste water on lawns and car washing could be fined up to $500 a day.

Deep Dive Into the Foreclosure Crisis

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In this video, NewsHour Economics Correspondent Paul Solman talks to Alyssa Katz, who wrote a book on the history of the housing market in America called Our Lot: How Real Estate Came to Own Us.

Economist Studies Why People Cheat

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Is cheating wrong? Are some types of cheating worse than others? NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to a behavioral economist about what influences cheating.

How Transparent Should the Fed Be?

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In this video on Making Sen$e of financial matters, NewsHour Economics Correspondent Paul Solman examines the Federal Reserve's attempts to balance the need for public disclosure and secrecy.

Is America on the Wane?

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NewsHour correspondent Paul Solman talks to Yale historian Paul Kennedy about the rise and fall of great economic powers like the United States.

Labor Unions Weakened by Recession

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The current recession has severely undercut the bargaining power of labor unions and workers' abilities to strike and gain concessions from company leadership. In this video, Economics Correspondent Paul Solman visits Rochester, New York, where 300 workers at the Mott's juice and apple sauce factory called a strike on May 23.

New Deal vs. the Stimulus Package

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Now that government money has begun to trickle down to specific projects in St. Louis, developers hope that the stimulus package will revitalize the city the way that the New Deal did in the 1930s.

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