ELA

Science (X) - ELA (X) - Animals (X)

Amphibians (1996)

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Get ready for “toad-al” fun with Bill Nye and the “Amphibians” episode. Frogs, toads, salamanders, newts, and caecilians (worm-like animals that have backbones) are all amphibians, animals that spend part of their lives in water and part on land. Amphibians are slimy. Amphibians are cold-blooded that means their body temperature changes with the temperature outside.

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Elementary
Middle
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00:23
Amphibians

The Animals of Alaska: Rosen Real Readers (Unabridged)

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Polar bears... grizzly bears... Caribou.... moose... snowshoe hares... bald eageles. There is a wonderful variety of wild animals that live in Alaska. This audiobook Introduces the animals that live and thrive in Alaska's harsh environment.

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00:03
The Animals of Alaska: Rosen Real Readers (Unabridged)

Sloth Canopy Researcher: Bryson Voirin

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Interview with Biologist: Bryson Viorin.

Animals: Black and White

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Find the answers to seven black-and-white riddles in a beautiful book of nature's bold designs! What cuddly giant loves to chew bamboo? What mammal swims with its friends in a school? What bird "flies" gracefully through the water?

Animals: Black and White

Makey Takey: Zoo Animals

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This kit is designed for use as a group project with a Pre-K or Kindergarten Class. This was designed to address the Next Gen. Science standards P-LS1-1: Observe familiar plants and animals (including humans) and describe what they need to survive, and K-ESS3-1: Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live. The lesson plan can be found later in the record.

The kit includes the following materials:

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Can Trauma Be Passed to the Next Generation Through DNA?

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Learn about the genetic factors that may make a person more prone to anxiety with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from August 30, 2015.

Why Do Our Brains Love Fake News? | Above the Noise

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Ever have an argument with someone, and no matter how many facts you provide, you just can’t get that person to see it your way? One big reason for this is cognitive bias, which is a limitation in our thinking that can cause flaws in our judgement. Confirmation bias is a specific type of cognitive bias that motivates us to seek out information we already believe and ignore or minimize facts that threaten what we believe. Studies show that when people are presented with facts that contradict what they believe, the parts of the brain that control reason and rationality go inactive. But, the parts of the brain that process emotion light up like the Fourth of July. In this video, host Myles Bess dives into the research and offers some tips to combat confirmation bias. This resource is part of the News and Media Literacy Collection.

Choosing Foods for Your Health

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Learn from Misty and Tim, two teens who have diabetes, about the food choices they make to help them control their condition, in these two video segments adapted from Living With MyType2. Misty is a college student learning to adapt her dietary needs to a new environment filled with options. Tim goes grocery shopping with his mother and explains how he identifies foods as healthy or unhealthy based on their ingredients and location in the store.

Nasal Spray May Be Lifesaver for Snake Bite Victims

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Snakes! Show your students how applied science works with this PBS NewsHour story on treating snake bites from June 19, 2014. Although snake bites are rarely fatal in the United States, every year about 100,000 people die worldwide after being bitten by venomous snakes. A California doctor has developed a nasal spray treatment that halts paralysis before they reach a hospital.

Backyard Bugs | WILD TV

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Do you like insects? In this video from Wild TV, you will see and hear about many different kinds of insects. Some crawl like spiders and centipedes, while others fly, walk on water and even flip and click. You will learn the names of some interesting-looking insects. You will also learn how to be safe around dangerous spiders and how to identify male and female Dobson flies. By listening and watching closely, you can tell how the speakers feel about the various insects by the ways the speakers react to and talk about the insects.

Pourquoi Stories | Jakers!

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This video segment from Jakers features a storyteller who tells a Pourquoi story about a spider. Pourquoi is the French word for "why". Pourquoi stories try to explain in an entertaining way why something happens or why things are the way they are, especially in nature. This lively story is about Anansi the Spider, a popular character in African folklore. We hear an imaginary tale that tries to explain why the lowest part of a spider's body is so big. Could it really be because of the plan the greedy spider Anansi came up with to eat two feasts in one day?

The Big Adventures of Little Ioda: Whale of a Tail

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Ioda ventures through an amazing talking book with Lion, Captain Caption, Humpback, and Mrs. Whale! This video is part of the first grade lesson “Whales!," found in the REACH Parent Engagement Series from Public Media Connect/ThinkTV-CET.

Between the Lions - If You Were: Cat

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Learn vocabulary by imagining yourself as a cat, in this video from the Between the Lions episode "Not Norman." Whether a wild cat or a house cat, all cats use their tails for balance, and their ears to hear very quiet sounds. All cats also have soft paws that they use to sneak quietly around and claws they can use to climb trees. Featured vocabulary words include: cat, house cat, wild cat, eyes, ears, feet, paws, claws, tail, and cat nap.

Nature Nuggets: Tortoise Shares Home

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Watch and find out who the gopher tortoise shares his burrow (underground home) with.

Nature Nuggets are minute-long videos that bring science and animals from PBS’s award-winning series NATURE to early childhood classrooms. Use the support material below to create active science and language learning opportunities for your students.

Puppy Walker

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In this segment from Zoom into Action, Brett trains puppies to be seeing-eye dogs. He volunteers as a puppy walker for the Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind. He is working with a puppy named Arty for one year. His job is to socialize Arty and teach him to follow commands. At the end of the year, Brett has to bring Arty back for more training so he will be ready to work with a person who has a visual imparity. Brett knows his work is for a very good cause. When it’s time to give up the puppy, he isn’t too disappointed.

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