ELA

Science (X) - ELA (X) - Evolution (X)

Can Trauma Be Passed to the Next Generation Through DNA?

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Learn about the genetic factors that may make a person more prone to anxiety with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from August 30, 2015.

Between the Lions - If You Were: Cat

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Learn vocabulary by imagining yourself as a cat, in this video from the Between the Lions episode "Not Norman." Whether a wild cat or a house cat, all cats use their tails for balance, and their ears to hear very quiet sounds. All cats also have soft paws that they use to sneak quietly around and claws they can use to climb trees. Featured vocabulary words include: cat, house cat, wild cat, eyes, ears, feet, paws, claws, tail, and cat nap.

The Big Adventures of Little Ioda: In Plain Sight

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In this adventure, little Ioda takes hide and seek to a whole new level! This video is also found in the Kindergarten lesson "Camouflage!" part of the REACH Parent Engagement Series from Public Media Connect/ThinkTV-CET.

Sea Creatures

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The largest and least explored place on earth is in the deep sea below the ocean’s surface. The fish and other sea animals of the deep sea employ many strategies to surprise their prey including ambush and camouflage by blending into the sea environment. The deeper you go in the ocean, the more unusual and unique the fish appear to be. Learn about the ghostly squid, the simulating jelly fish, the viper fish, and the gulper fish (among many others) in this video segment from Nature.

Between the Lions - If You Were: Beetle

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Learn about the diverse beetle species of the world, and imagine yourself as a beetle, in this segment from the Between the Lions episode "Bugs & Beetle Bop." There are many different types of beetles, including tiger beetles and ladybugs. Beetles can live in water, wood or dirt, depending on their species. Beetles may be small, but they have the largest animal family tree with over 370,000 kinds. Featured vocabulary words include: beetle, feather-winger beetle, titan beetle, scarab beetle, lighting bug, ladybug, tiger beetle, and dung beetle.

Social and Cultural Perspectives of Dogs

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This video segment from Nature provides information about the social and cultural perspectives of humans’ relationships with dogs. Our ability to communicate and socialize with dogs has changed our lives. Not only can we teach dogs fun tricks to do, but we can teach them to do tasks we cannot do. Herding dogs, for example, help people manage sheep. The dogs can follow the shepherd’s command to herd in sheep from over a half mile away. Because they spend so much time together, shepherds and dogs form a close social bond.

Social and Historical Perspectives of Dogs

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In this video segment from Nature, learn about the evolution of dogs. More than 750 million people share their lives with dogs today. This video explores theories of how dogs became a domestic pet. One theory is ancient people tamed wild wolves. This theory is challenged by the idea that wolves evolved themselves into a different species. Biologist Raymond Coppinger believes human garbage heaps may have caused wolves to be drawn to feed on them. Competition among the wolves may have caused them to transform into "dogs,” that were not frightened of humans who came to the dumps.

The Shark and the Lamprey

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Jonathan shares how a seemingly trivial observation of parasitic lampreys on the backs of basking sharks led to an important discovery about the biology of the parasitic sea lamprey. He returned the next year with a shark biologist and a lamprey biologist to attempt to recover living lampreys from the backs of Basking sharks. The accompanying lesson plan guides students through a scientific investigation that encourages students to ask questions about their observations and foster scientific inquiry.

Deadly Fungus Threatens Bananas | PBS NewsHour

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Learn why researchers are fighting to save the world's bananas with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from January 22, 2016.

New Study Predicts Major Extinction Event in Earth’s Near Future

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Students will analyze a new scientific hypothesis that predicts a major extinction on Earth within the next 100 years with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from June 2, 2014. According to new research published in the journal Science, plant and animal extinctions are happening at a rate 1,000 times greater than before humans walked the Earth.

Beef Industry Looks to Slim Down its Carbon Footprint | PBS NewsHour

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See how beef producers are thinking about the impact of cattle on the climate with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from December 1, 2015.

Shark Biology

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Sharks are evolutionary advanced animals and are incredibly well adapted for their place in ocean ecosystems. In this video, differences between sharks and other fish are highlighted and celebrated. One such difference is in each group’s ability to control their vertical position in the water. Bony fish have a swim bladder that they can inflate and deflate to control their buoyancy. Sharks, on the other hand, must swim and control their depth with their fins. The included lesson looks at the basic biology of sharks and how sharks and bony fish control buoyancy.

Monarch Butterflies Could Make Endangered Species List

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Investigate the demise of the monarch butterfly with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from January 11, 2015.

Should Miami Aquarium Release ‘World’s Loneliest Orca’?

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Debate the issue of releasing captive whales into the wild with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from January 25, 2015.

Blue Shark Adventure

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In this video, Jonathan learns about how shark tagging has shed light on the biology of and behavior of Blue sharks. Tagging them off the coast of Rhode Island has shown that these incredible swimmers actually migrate completely across the Atlantic ocean. Jonathan tries his hand at tagging a shark and then swims with Blue sharks. We also learn that Blue sharks are not nearly as vicious as they have been reputed to be, and the divers are actually able to pet the sharks! The study guide introduces viewers to pelagic animals and how tagging them can help learn about their migration.

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