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New York State Kids Room

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Introduce kids to the emblems of New York State, including the New York State Seal, the New York State Flag, and the New York State Coat of Arms.

New York State Constitution

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This edition of the New York State Constitution is provided as a public service by the:

Department of State
Division of Administrative Rules
Albany, NY 12231-0001

Enchanted Learning Explorers Page

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Find explorers by name, age, and geographic region. Includes route maps as well.

New York County Selection Map

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Based on the 2010 Census, this page includes census data by county for New York State. Click on a county to find out the population statistics.

New York State Senate Districts

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Map of the New York State Senate Districts.

New York's Congressional Districts

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New York is a U.S. state with two senators in the United States Senate and 27 representatives in the United States House of Representatives.

Includes a summary of the Senators and Representatives and a map of the districts in New York State.

NYSDEC Energy and Climate

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This section explores energy, climate and the connections between them. The focus is on the policies, programs and plans DEC and New York State have made to reduce emissions of climate-changing greenhouse gases and to help New Yorkers adapt as the climate changes.

Information on New York's energy resources, including oil, natural gas and renewable sources can also be accessed from the links on this page.

USDA Hardiness Zones for New York

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Hardiness Zone information helps you determine which herbaceous perennials and woody trees, shrubs and vines will survive winters where you garden.

Northeast Regional Climate Center

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Established in 1983, the Northeast Regional Climate Center (NRCC) is located in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University. It serves the 12-state region that includes: Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia. Major funding is provided through a contract with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

NYSGIS Clearinghouse

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Topographic maps accessible via map, quadrangle name, USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) code or DOT (Department of Transportation) code. Includes orthoimagery.

MyTopo

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Contains USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) topographic maps, NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) nautical and aeronautical charts and aerial photographs. Search by place name, zip code, map/chart name or number or latitude and longitude.

Historic USGS Maps of New York

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The image map showing the State of NewYork includes a grid marked off in 15 minute increments. Each rectangle points to a web page that lists the available images for this quadrangle. For any particular date, there will most often be four images because the maps were scanned as four sections. Each image is typically 2 megabytes, so download times are likely to be slow. The size was chosen to maintain an acceptable level of detail.

Grey blocks indicate areas where no map is available.

Whole Number Exponents (Online Textbook)

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Have you ever designed a tiger cage? Do you know how to use exponents to solve real world problems? Look at what Miguel learned about this very topic.

Whole Number Multiplication (Online Textbook)

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Have you ever wondered how much fish a seal can eat?

Whole Number Subtraction (Online Textbook)

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Have you ever seen seals at the zoo? They are fascinating animals.

Jonah loves working with the seals. In fact, he learns more and more about them every day. One day when he arrived at work, Jonah discovered that there had been a new baby seal pup born the night before. The workers at the zoo had weighed the new pup and his mother just that morning. The mother seal had weighed 157 pounds when she had been weighed alone. The combined weight of both the Mother and pup was 171 pounds.

What did the new pup weigh?

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