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Adding Negative Numbers | PBS Math Club

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Challenge your knowledge of addition of positive and negative integers with this YouTube quiz from the PBS Math Club.

What is an Integer? - Quiz | PBS Math Club

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Challenge your knowledge of positive and negative integers with this YouTube quiz from the PBS Math Club.

"Trick" for Adding and Subtracting HUGE Numbers | PBS Math Club

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Introducing a "trick" for the addition and subtraction of positive and negative numbers. This Math Club episode provides the ABCDE's to remember the rules for the sums and differences of signed numbers.

Current Day Challenges & Activism | And Then They Came For Us

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The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, and economic changes to ensure equal civil liberties for all humans—along with a history of resisting factors that have tried to prevent such successful efforts.

Activists have challenged injustices, from the indigenous communities opposing European colonization to U.S. citizens protesting against travel bans and incarceration of refugees into concentration camps. Using scenes from the 2017 film And Then They Came For Us, students and teacher(s) will identify common successes and challenges experienced by various activist movements, in the associated lesson. 

This video clip is from the film, “And Then They Came For Us,” (c) Ginzberg Productions, 2017. All rights reserved.

The Fred T. Korematsu Institute educates to advance racial equity, social justice, and human rights for all.

This project was funded, in part, by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the opinions or policies of the U.S. Government. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute their endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Impact of 1928 Hurricane on Everglades Migrant Workers | The Swamp

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Learn how a dike built to manage water levels in Everglades swamplands for farming failed to prevent catastrophic flooding during the Okeechobee Hurricane of 1928, resulting in thousands of deaths of mostly black migrant workers, in these clips adapted from The Swamp | AMERICAN EXPERIENCE.

Just War Theory and FDR’s Declaration of War

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This lesson introduces students to the principles of just war theory, the basis of international agreements such as the Geneva Conventions that regulate the conduct of nations in wartime. The lesson asks students to consider the six principles of jus ad bellum, or what makes a war just, as applied to World War II. Students read Roosevelt’s Joint Address to Congress Leading to a Declaration of War Against Japan (the "day that will live in infamy" speech) in order to assess whether or not Roosevelt spelled out the case for a just war.

Students will:

  • Examine the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and identify its effect on U.S. history.
  • Review elements of just war theory, the basis of international law regarding warfare.
  • Analyze a speech and its effect on the American people.

Combat and War

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The experience of combat is perhaps the ultimate test for human beings. No other human activity creates such heightened emotions. No other human activity is so potentially final in its results. Humans often have a paradoxical relationship with combat and war; sometimes it is revered and other times despised. We use its euphemisms in describing athletic events (check out the headlines on any sports page). We see it glorified in our literature and condemned in our political speeches.

The sheer terror of knowing that the next one is going to have your name on it, when that goes on and on and on...you get a strange feeling in which you seem to become detached and you just think, well maybe this will end and maybe it won’t and maybe we’ll all be blown up and maybe we won’t... but who cares. And you learn to sort of live with it. It is just a matter of fate. You will either survive if the Lord is willing or you will not. So there’s really nothing you can do. And you just take it.

— Sidney Phillips, The War

Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Analyze combat testimonials from World War II.
  • Identify the physical and psychological injuries that soldiers experience.

 

A Change is Gonna Come: Personal Narratives of Transformative Life Journeys

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In this close reading English Language Arts activity set, students examine and discuss the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI), a program that offers Bard College degrees in select New York State prisons. Students who are accepted into this degree program follow the same course of study for the same degrees as a Bard student does at Bard College. These activities emphasize one BPI student’s story, from his life prior to prison through his experiences as a student in the BPI program to life after leaving prison. These materials examine the stories through an ELA lens, but the nature of the content and the focus on personal narratives bring to the forefront social, economic, and social justice issues.

These activities ask students to expand their understanding of “close reading.” Students will be asked to listen to and observe the language of each clip closely. Students will not be literally reading a text for comprehension, but will instead analyze and derive meaning through careful listening to spoken words and careful observation of individuals’ actions and other visual cues presented in each clip. In doing so, students will be close reading audio-visual media as text for comprehension and deeper understanding.

     Opening Statement: 

     "During my interviews for College Behind Bars, I didn't have a particular thought process or approach to answering the interview questions. My language and insights were the natural outgrowth of the education I received with the Bard College Prison Initiative (BPI). Today, there exists great consensus that mass incarceration is a social problem. In the early 1990s, it was portrayed as the appropriate response to the activities of so-called "superpredators." The label confused me. It conflicted with the person I knew myself to be. Enrolling in BPI gave me the tools that would assist my understanding of the world in which I lived and myself. By the time we began working on the film, I had completed my undergraduate degree and devoted a lot of time to reflecting on why I was in prison. I felt prepared, and empowered, to tell my story."

-Jule Hall, BPI Graduate

About the author: Heidi Miller, MFA, is an arts educator based in New York, New York. 

Flappers and Speakeasies

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From 1920-1933, the United States was a dry country. The 18th Amendment to the Constitution prohibited the making, transportation, and sale of alcohol. Americans went to illegal bars, called “speakeasies,” on the sly to drink. 

Learning objectives:

Students will:

  • Understand how Prohibition created an underground club scene that started in New York City and eventually proliferated to the rest of the United States;
  • Analyze how Prohibition led to a social and cultural revolution for women.

 

Wild West: Creating Landmarks | Lost L.A.

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Long before Hollywood imagined the Wild West, Los Angeles was a real frontier town of gunslingers, lynch mobs, and smoke-belching locomotives. Students will explore the historic processes in which landmarks have been created by analyzing various primary source documents. 

Visit the Lost L.A. website to learn more!

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