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History, Access to Care, and Emerging Genetic-Based Therapies

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In The Gene, we learn about the National Institute of Health’s All of Us program. All of Us seeks to enroll 1 million diverse research participants. The program aims to collect detailed medical and health information on people—including their genetic profile—as an effort, in part, to develop health care options that are more precisely tailored to individual needs. Broad participation is needed for researchers to better understand the often complex connections between genetic makeup and health status. The goal of the All of Us program and other similar endeavors is to one day enable people from a range of ethnicities and personal identities to have more tailored information about their health risks and their response to medications, which can inform and possibly improve their care.

The support materials were created by the Personal Genetics Education Project.

 

Evidence of a Warm Arctic Climate | Polar Extremes

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Learn why the presence of 50-million-year-old petrified tree stumps and a variety of semiaquatic animal fossils on Canada's Ellesmere Island suggests that the Arctic was once warm swampland in these videos from NOVA: Polar Extremes. This region, about 800 miles from the North Pole, was once covered with freshwater vegetation and inhabited by creatures commonly associated with a warm, humid climate. Use this resource to examine the types of evidence that scientists use to support their understanding of Earth's climate history.

Privacy Protections for Genetic Information: Meet GINA

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What is GINA (the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act), and what are the specific rights and protections it offers? 

The support materials were created by the Personal Genetics Education Project.

 

Genome Editing and CRISPR

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How might advances in our ability to change genomes impact individuals and society?

The support materials were created by the Personal Genetics Education Project.

 

When New Treatments Come with Big Hopes and a Big Price Tag: Spinal Muscular Atrophy

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Having what is considered a “rare” genetic disorder is more common than many people might realize. Approximately 6,800 diseases are considered rare, although the term rare is defined slightly differently in different parts of the world. In the United States, the designation is applied to diseases that affect fewer than 200,000 people in the nation. Rare diseases are thought to affect more than 300 million people worldwide.

Take a look at the treatment development process and explore the tragedy and triumph of a family affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

The support materials were created by the Personal Genetics Education Project.

 

Ancestry Testing in the Genomic Age

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This lesson focuses on genetic ancestry testing and the exciting and complicated layers it can add to people's concepts of identity and history.

The support materials were created by the Personal Genetics Education Project.

 

Think Like a Scientist: Gorongosa

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Learn about the large-scale project to restore the wildlife of Gorongosa National Park. The video highlights the project’s approach of combining traditional conservation biology with solutions for addressing challenges in the community.

Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique was once one of Africa's richest wildlife refuges, but a civil war and illegal poaching pushed Gorongosa’s wildlife populations to near extinction. Today, many animal populations have recovered thanks to a large-scale restoration project started more than 10 years ago by philanthropist Greg Carr. In the video, Carr recalls how he first learned about the park and became committed to restoring and protecting its wildlife. The film also features Princeton University ecologist Robert Pringle, whose research in Gorongosa is helping guide this restoration project. As Pringle explains, the project’s success depends not only on the ability to protect animal and plant species, but also on meeting ongoing challenges of overpopulation and poverty in the area. This video can be used to provide context and engagement for a variety of resources about Gorongosa National Park.

This media resource was generously provided by HHMI BioInteractive. Discover tools to help plan lessons and opportunities to support professional learning on the HHMI BioInteractive website.

A Science-Based Approach to Restoring Gorongosa's Wildlife

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Follow scientists from Gorongosa National Park as they relocate zebras from a nearby reserve as part of the effort to restore healthy wildlife populations.

The Gorongosa Restoration Project is a long-term effort to return the Gorongosa ecosystem in Mozambique to a healthy and balanced state after a devastating civil war. Surveys have revealed that, although many species of large animals are recovering, species such as zebras are so few in number that they are in danger of disappearing. In this video, scientists explain how the relocation effort was planned and executed, and what relocating wildlife means for the recovery of the park. The accompanying “Student Worksheet” incorporates concepts and information from the video.

This media resource was generously provided by HHMI BioInteractive. Discover tools to help plan lessons and opportunities to support professional learning on the HHMI BioInteractive website.

Weathering: Earth's Natural Carbon Dioxide Removal Process | Polar Extremes

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Learn about the role that the carbon cycle plays in maintaining Earth’s climate balance in this video from NOVA: Polar Extremes. Use this resource to illustrate a portion of the carbon cycle and how weathering acts as a natural process of carbon sequestration and to engage students in thinking about the impacts of disrupting the carbon cycle.

Tracking Lion Recovery in Gorongosa

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Learn how scientists in Gorongosa National Park are using GPS satellite collars and motion-sensitive cameras to gather data about the recovery of the park’s lion population.

Gorongosa National Park was once famous for its lion population, attracting tourists from all over the world. But during Mozambique’s struggle for independence and subsequent civil war, the park’s iconic wildlife was slaughtered. In 2008, a massive ecosystem restoration project began. Today, many animals are bouncing back in large numbers, but it’s unclear whether the lions are also making a strong recovery.

Ecologist Paola Bouley heads the Gorongosa Lion Project, an effort to document the lions’ response to the park’s restoration and identify any factors that may limit their recovery. Working with Mozambican scientists Celina Dias and Domingas Alexio, Bouley is using GPS satellite collars and trail cameras to identify new lions and gather data about their behavior. These tools are also proving invaluable in protecting lions against poachers.

This media resource was generously provided by HHMI BioInteractive. Discover tools to help plan lessons and opportunities to support professional learning on the HHMI BioInteractive website.

 

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