Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

Future of Cancer Treatment | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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The future of cancer research and treatment is optimistic. Now that scientists are able to fully understand the disease, development into more advanced treatments is the next mission that oncologists must face.

Mary-Claire King | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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In the 1970s, Mary Claire King began investigating genetic links of cancer in families, and discovered the genetic mutation that causes breast cancer, proving that certain types of breast cancers are genetic diseases.

Prevention and Fairness Doctrine | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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Anti-Tobacco ads began running in the late 1960s under the Fairness Doctrine. The fight against cancer turns towards prevention, which opens new doors in combating the disease. Now, rather than a issue of biology and medicine, it became an issue of psychology and advertising.

Dr. Robert Weinberg | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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One of the most impressive breakthroughs in the understanding of cancer was the oncogene: a gene that controls normal, safe cellular growth that can undergo a mutation, therefore becoming cancerous. Robert Weinberg developed experiments to identify the first human oncogene, the Ras Oncogene.

Cigarette Infographic | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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This video infographic charts the decline of smoking though the decades, from the last smoking advertisement in 1971 through to the 1980s and 1990s, when awareness of the link between smoking and cancer continued to grow in the public eye.

Scientific Method (Media Gallery) | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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The history of cancer research has shown how scientists have used the basic steps of the scientific method to make new discoveries and advances in the understanding of cancer, cancer treatment and cancer cures. Watch the clips below about scientists Dr. Sidney Farber, Dr. Bernard Fisher, and Dr. Robert Weinberg, and identify and discuss the steps they took to make their discoveries. What was the problem they were trying to solve? What evidence did they have? What kind of experiments did they conduct? What conclusions did they draw from their experiments? Were they able to replicate their experiments?

Dr. Suzanne Cole | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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Dr. Cole works with patients who are dealing with end-of-life choices.

Tobacco, Advertising, and Cancer - Media Literacy Activities | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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Media can be a powerful force in shaping perceptions about products and our own consumption habits. During the early to mid 20th Century, cigarette advertising was pervasive and the use of it was high. In the 1970s, a wave of anti-smoking advertising was released which ultimately changed the public’s perception and use of tobacco. The media encouraged people to smoke and when scientists proved that smoking was harmful the media in turn encouraged people to stop. In viewing these three clips from Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, students will understand how media can influence the habits and attitudes of an audience.

Why is Cancer So Difficult to Cure? | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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Cancer cells are constantly mutating within your body. Treatment is a dynamic concept, both between different people and even within the same patient, become drug resistance is a common trait of the disease's evolution.

Dr. Wilson | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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Dr. Lori Wilson is an oncologist who was diagnosed with breast cancer. She survived and continues to practice as a surgical oncologist. She talks about the importance having an open and supportive relationship between doctors and their patients.

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