Crash Course

American Imperialism | Crash Course US History #28

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In which John Green teaches you about Imperialism. In the late 19th century, the great powers of Europe were running around the world obtaining colonial possessions, especially in Africa and Asia. The United States, which as a young country, was especially suceptible to peer pressure, followed along and snapped up some colonies of its own. The US saw that Spain's hold on its empire was weak, and like some kind of expansionist predator, it jumped into the Cuban War for Independence and turned it into the Spanish-Cuban-Phillipino-American War, which usually just gets called the Spanish-American War.

The Renaissance: Was it a Thing? | Crash Course World History

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John Green teaches you about the European Renaissance. European learning changed the world in the 15th and 16th century, but was it a cultural revolution, or an evolution? We'd argue that any cultural shift that occurs over a couple of hundred years isn't too overwhelming to the people who live through it. In retrospect though, the cultural bloom in Europe during this time was pretty impressive. In addition to investigating what caused the Renaissance and who benefitted from the changes that occurred, John will tell you just how the Ninja Turtles got mixed up in all this.

Latin American Revolutions | Crash Course World History

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John Green talks about the many revolutions of Latin America in the 19th century. At the beginning of the 1800s, Latin America was firmly under the control of Spain and Portugal. The revolutionary zeal that had recently created the United States and had taken off Louis XVI's head in France arrived in South America, and a racially diverse group of people who felt more South American than European took over. John covers the soft revolution of Brazil, in which Prince Pedro boldly seized power from his father, but promised to give it back if King João ever returned to Brazil. He also covers the decidedly more violent revolutions in Mexico, Venezuela, and Argentina. Watch the video to see Simón Bolívar's dream of a United South America crushed, even as he manages to liberate a bunch of countries and get two currencies and about a thousand schools and parks named after him.

Thomas Jefferson and His Democracy | Crash Course US History #10

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John Green teaches you about founding father and third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson is a somewhat controversial figure in American history, largely because he, like pretty much all humans, was a big bundle of contradictions. Jefferson was a slave-owner who couldn't decide if he liked slavery. He advocated for small government, but expanded federal power more than either of his presidential predecessors. John explores Jefferson's election, his policies, and some of the new nation's (literally and figuratively) formative events that took place during Jefferson's presidency. In addition to all this, Napoleon drops in to sell Louisiana, John Marshall sets the course of the Supreme Court, and John Adams gets called a tiny tyrant.

Conflict in Israel and Palestine | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about conflict in Israel and Palestine. This conflict is often cast as a long-term dispute going back thousands of years and rooted in a clash between religions. As always, there is more to the situation. What is true is that the conflict is immensely complicated - and just about everyone in the world has an opinion about it. Educate yourself by tuning into this episode of Crash Course.

Nonviolence and Peace Movements | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about nonviolence and peace movements in the 20th century. What is nonviolence? What is a peace movement? Traditionally, humans often resort to violence when they come into conflict. In the 20th century, it became much more common for people to enact change by means of nonviolence, and this was a common thread of connection between many of the most notable advocates of peaceful change. Crash Course will take you along a path of nonviolent resistance and peaceful change including Gandhi, Gregg, Bayard Rustin, Martin Luther King, Jr., the Cold War , and the Arab Spring.

Iran's Revolutions | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about Iran's Revolutions. What was the 1979 Iranian Revolution about? As it turns out, Iran has had a long history of unrest in order to put power in the hands of the people. The most recent revolution in 1979 was not necessarily about creating an Islamic state, at least at first. Later, it certainly came to be about that, but it was initially just about people who wanted to get rid of an oppressive regime. Listen up as John teaches you about Iran's long history of revolution.

Population, Sustainability, and Malthus | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about human population. How many people can reasonably live on the Earth? In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed one billion. Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling and that the population would level off. He was completely wrong, as there are currently seven billion people on the planet! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer.

Democracy, Authoritarian Capitalism, and China | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about the reach of government, growing economies, and potentially the end of the world as we know it. For the last hundred years or so, a seemingly important ingredient for running an economically successful country has been a Western-style democratic government. All evidence has pointed to the idea that capitalist representative democracies make for the best economic outcomes. It turns out that such a government isn't the only way to succeed. Over the past forty or so years, authoritarian capitalism as it is practiced in places like China and Singapore has been working really, really well. John will look at these systems and talk about why they work, and he'll even make a few predictions about the future.

Controlling Bureaucracies | Crash Course Government and Politics

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In which we learn how bureaucracies are kept in check. In prior episodes, we discussed what bureaucracies are, and why they are formed. In this episode, we finish our discussion of bureaucracy by looking at methods that other branches of government use to manage power.

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