EARTH A New Wild

Budding Conifer Timelapses | EARTH A New Wild

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Conifers (commonly known as evergreen or pine trees) have long, flat needles in place of what we often think of as plant leaves. In this time-lapse, see the budding of conifer needles in a new perspective. Use this resource to teach about plant biology or plant taxonomy.

Lemon Shark Research | EARTH A New Wild

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In this interview, Doctor Samuel Gruber talks about his experience with lemon shark research in the Bahamas. His research into shark reproduction and anatomy represent a connection that many researchers feel towards the protection of marine biology. Use this resource to introduce students to marine research, marine conservation, and animal reproduction.

Sexual Selection in Cichlids | EARTH A New Wild

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Cichlid fish are seen here eating (and spitting out) soil from the bottom of Lake Malawi. This bizarre behavior is not for nutrition, though, but is actually used to create pits and mounds in the soil for a mating ritual. Although the fish are only a few centimeters long, some of these formations can be as big as a fully-grown diver. Use this resource as an example of mating behavior and sexual selection.

Collecting Data on Shark Pups | EARTH A New Wild

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Listen to this marine biologist explain the methods behind shark research and data collection. After catching the animals, data is collected using various standardized measurements on the specimen; after the sampling is finished, these sharks are tagged with a microchip to allow future researchers to track measurements over time. Use this video to show students an example of marine research and data collection, and to introduce concepts about tagging, measurements, or population sampling.

Harvesting Herring Eggs | EARTH A New Wild

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Using a method that goes back generations, fishermen in Alaska use an entirely natural method to harvest eggs from spawning herring. Use this resource to teach about sustainable farming and customs indigenous to Alaska and Canada.

Cattle in Kenya | EARTH A New Wild

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Livestock in the African savannah may often seem intrusive to the native wildlife, but in fact cattle create a much more sustainable ecosystem. Maasai farmers from Kenya have long been aware of this symbiotic relationship between cattle and the grassland, which has only been able to persist in territory that has not been converted into National Parks. Use this video to demonstrate symbiosis, the positive impact of grazing livestock, and a larger understand of African ecology.

Cichlid Territoriality | EARTH A New Wild

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Some types of cichlids are territorial, often being fiercely protective of their home shelter. This species in Lake Malawi watches over an abandoned snail shell, which it uses as protection for both itself and its young. Use this video as a resource to teach about animal behavior and aquatic ecology.

Conflicts with Elephants | EARTH A New Wild

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Hear this first-hand account from a Sumatran farmer and his dangerous encounters with elephants. These animals, while generally not aggressive towards humans, have come into increasing conflict with farmers that compete over the same patches of forest. Use this resource to learn about wildlife management and elephant behavior.

Farming the Desert | EARTH A New Wild

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As the desert in West Africa's Sahel region began growing faster than ever in the 1970s and 1980s and many farmers left the land, a farmer in a small town in northern Burkina Faso developed creative methods to restore soils damaged by drought. Yacouba Sawadogo innovated on regionally well-known farming techniques to create a large, easy-to-farm foreseted area, working with his community to reinvent agriculture in the region.

The Keeling Curve | EARTH A New Wild

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The Keeling Curve, a graph of the atmosphere's carbon dioxide concentration beginning in 1958, demonstrates how gas composition changes annually with the Earth's seasons. During the autumn and winter when leaves decay, the concentration of carbon dioxide increases; during the spring and summer when plants can photosynthesize, the concentration decreases. Over a long-enough span of time, scientists can detect a steady rise in mean carbon dioxide concentrations, indicative of global climate change.

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