The Ken Burns Collection

Doug Glanville on Barry Bonds | Ken Burns & Lynn Novick: Baseball - The Tenth Inning

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Former Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Doug Glanville talks about Barry Bonds.

Omar Vizquel on Cultural Differences | Ken Burns & Lynn Novick: Baseball - The Tenth Inning

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Omar Vizquel talks about the cultural difference of being a Latin player in baseball.

Yellowstone Gate | Ken Burns: The National Parks

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Ranger Shelton Johnson talks about the first time he arrived in Yellowstone and what he felt as he read the inscription on the Roosevelt Arch.

Felipe Alou on the Language Barrier | Ken Burns & Lynn Novick: Baseball - The Tenth Inning

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Felipe Alou talks about the language barrier and the ridicule Spanish speakers faced.

Grand Tetons | Ken Burns: The National Parks

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Writer and conservationist Terry Tempest Williams talks about what the Grand Tetons mean to her. The memory of the National Parks and the tradition families have of going to them is strong and linked by many personal stories.

Omar Vizquel on Coming to America | Ken Burns & Lynn Novick: Baseball - The Tenth Inning

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Omar Vizquel talks about coming to the United States from Venezuela and arriving in Butte, Montana.

Sage | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Every reporter wanted a quote from Twain about events of the day. He became the sage of the country.

"The Innocents Abroad" | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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In July of 1869, Twain's The Innocents Abroad appeared at last. It was a subscription book sold door-to-door, and it made Mark Twain the most successful writer in the world. Instead of going for a cultivated audience, Twain went for the masses. "Great books are wine," said Twain. "My books are water...but everybody drinks water."

"Huckleberry Finn" | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Huckleberry Finn is one of Mark Twain's most beloved characters, and the book his masterpiece. Twain's novel was told from a southern perspective, and took away any romanticism with slavery.

The Problem of Race | Ken Burns: Mark Twain

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Twain knew if America was going to be a great nation, the problem of race had to be talked about and brought to light. Mark Twain saw what America was about and he was not afraid to hold up a mirror.

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