MPT

What's In the Water

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In recent news reports, it has been said that various traces of pharmaceuticals have been recovered in the Chesapeake Bay and other Maryland water ways, including even some tap water. These traces are called PPCPs and according to research have been showing up in Maryland water for over a decade. Currently, testing and research is being done to find out at what risk PPCPs are putting on wildlife and humans.

Blue Crab Blues

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The blue crab is of large value to the state of Maryland for several reasons. The crab is a predator and scavenger in the food web of the bay habitat and ecosystem. Understand the importance of the blue crab species to the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay. Learn what scientists have discovered about the life cycle of blue crabs and the threats facing the blue crab population.

A World Away

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Middle school students from across Maryland spend a week at Camp North Bay to build self-confidence and learn ways that they can take good risks to make a difference in our environment. Students have opportunities to discover and identify different types of wildlife in the area, ride a 500 foot long zip line, and learn meaningful lessons about positively interacting with each other and with nature.

Island Crusader

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Steve White attempts to restore an island in the Chesapeake Bay that was destroyed by Hurricane Isabelle. The eroding island is densely populated with wildlife, especially pelicans and other wildfowl.

Chesapeake Born

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The Chesapeake Bay retriever is the official Maryland State Dog. They are a versatile breed of Labrador Retrievers, trained for various jobs, including protecting the bay habitat in Maryland.

Mystery of Bees

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Honeybees in nearly 30 states had vanished from their hives, which is called colony collapse disorder. Scientists are working to discover the cause and cure.

The Low Points

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Throughout water systems in Maryland that are part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, particularly the South River near Annapolis, there is a large amount of polluted, sediment filled run-off. This run-off is largely in part caused by major real estate development throughout the state.

250 Million Tons Of It

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In the Susquehanna River, there is much polluted sediment build up compiled and slowly seeping into the Chesapeake Bay. However, large portions of the sediment are still compacted at three hydroelectric dams along the river in Pennsylvania and Maryland: Safe Harbor Dam, Holtwood Dam and Conowingo Dam. At these dams, much of the collected mud holds many pollutants, such as heavy metals, fertilizers, coal dusts, and waste. Most dangerous to the river and bay habitats, Phosphorous is also found trapped in the sediment behind these dams. In 1972, Tropical Storm Agnes released thousands of tons of this sediment into the bay ecosystem. There is much concern that another storm could let loose some or all of the remaining thousands of tons of this polluted mud.

Urban Planner

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A professor and graduate student talk about the use of math and technology in city planning.