PBS NewsHour

Alabama Tornado Aftermath | PBS Newshour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the video and answer the discussion questions. You may want to read along using the transcript.

Summary: Officials have released the names of 23 people who died from a tornado that hit Lee County, Alabama, on March 3, 2019. Rescue efforts are winding down, though many residents will face a long road to recovery after losing homes and livelihoods to the 170 mile-per-hour winds. President Donald Trump, who plans to visit victims of the tornado on Friday, tweeted: “FEMA has been told directly by me to give the A Plus treatment to the Great State of Alabama and the wonderful people who have been so devastated by the Tornadoes.” This was in contrast to how he reacted to Californians after last spring’s wildfires and victims of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, which included rhetoric blaming local leaders. Over the past thirty years, tornadoes have shifted their location — decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but increasing in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, according to a recent study in the journal Climate and Atmospheric Science.Scientists aren’t certain why this shift has taken place but are continuing their research.

March 6, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

 

Some Republican Leaders Raise Concerns over Trump Candidacy | PBS NewsHour

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Learn how several Republican leaders came out against leading presidential candidate Donald Trump with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from March 3, 2016

What’s It like to Go to School in a One-Room Schoolhouse? | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the videos and answer the discussion located under support materials. You may want to read along with the transcript.

Summary: The one-room schoolhouse may seem like a distant memory from US history, but about 200 of them still exist today, including tiny Valley Elementary School in Cody, Wyoming. It has only six students, but in Wyoming, education funding is redistributed so that students can have access to similar resources, no matter how small or remote their location. Mason Baum of Student Reporting Labs has the story.

May 31, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

Paris Attacks Raise Security Concerns Throughout Europe | PBS NewsHour

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See why politicians across Europe began voicing renewed concern for the ongoing refugee crisis that has brought hundreds of thousands of Syrians to Europe with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from November 18, 2015.

Democratic 2020 Candidates Debate Reparations | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the videos and answer the discussion questions below. 

Summary: The lasting impact of slavery is a current issue of debate for many Democratic 2020 presidential candidates. “America was founded on principles of liberty and freedom and on the backs of slave labor,” said Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat. “Until that original sin is addressed, we may think that we’re moving forward as one nation, but I don’t think that we ever really will,” said candidate Julian Castro, former housing secretary under President Obama.

Some candidates such as Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris and Andrew Yang believe there should be policies to benefit all communities regardless of race, such as universal income and stricter regulations on big banks. On the other hand, founder of the Equal Justice Society Eva Patterson argues that reparations are the only way to relieve the burden of centuries of slavery and discrimination for many African Americans today. “Reparations are a way to make us whole,” she says.

April 18, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

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Hillary Clinton Supporters Clash with Young Females, Sanders Supporters | PBS NewsHour

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Find out why Hillary Clinton has had to navigate controversy this week stemming from gender comments made by her supporters with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 8, 2016.

Study Guide: Michael Cohen Hearing | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the videos and answer the discussion questions. 

Summary: The testimony of former Donald Trump lawyer Michael Cohen in front of the House Oversight Committee produced a wide array of public opinion. NewsHour Correspondents Lisa Desjardins, who attended the hearing, and Yamiche Alcindor join Judy Woodruff to discuss the key takeaways, including House Republican and White House attacks on Cohen as not trustworthy and Cohen’s argument that Trump ran for president solely to enrich himself. Cohen admitted that he lied to a Senate Intelligence Committee in 2017, and apologized to the House committee. Cohen will testify in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee behind closed doors in three days of hearings.

February 28, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

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Capturing Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s Legacy | PBS NewsHour

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Learn about the life of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 15, 2016.

Trump’s Speech through a Media Literacy Lens | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the video and then answer the discussion questions.

Summary: On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump delivered a prime-time address from the Oval Office on the government shutdown and what he called the “humanitarian and national security crisis” at the border. Trump said that all Americans are hurt by uncontrolled illegal migration, adding that it “strains public resources and drives down jobs and wages.” Trump is demanding a taxpayer-funded $5 billion in border wall — an issue at the heart of a partial government shutdown that is now into its third week. Democratic lawmakers have been unwilling to pass budgets that include a border barrier. With both sides still at a stalemate, the partial government shutdown, at 19 days and counting, is already one of the longest shutdowns in modern history.

Dig deeper: When he was running for president, Trump campaigned on Mexico paying for the wall. Republican legislators previously proposing $25 billion for construction. To learn more, read NewsHour’s How Trump is trying to shift the shutdown debate and Trump says there’s a ‘crisis’ at the border. Here’s what the data says.

January 9, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

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Clinton and Cruz Win Iowa Caucuses | PBS NewsHour

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Find out the highlights of the Iowa Caucuses with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 1, 2016.

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