PLUM LANDING

How to Engage Kids and Families in Outdoor Science Activities | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he shares his tips for keeping students focused during outdoor science exploration in this video from PLUM LANDING. As Jessie explains, being outdoors can be fun, exciting—and distracting. Tips for keeping things on track include connecting outdoor activities to local ecosystems, building in opportunities for social interation, and , and minimizing time spent sitting and listening.

How to Adapt Outdoor Science Activities on the Fly | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he demonstrates how to adapt outdoor science activities in response to unexpected issues in this video from PLUM LANDING. Jessie addresses common problems, like like running out of time, having more people show up than expected, having mixed-aged groups of children, and running into inclement weather. For each issue, Jessie provides simple strategies for keeping things on track.

How to Use Digital Tools to Enhance Outdoor Science Exploration | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he shares some easy ways to infuse technology into outdoor science learning in this video from PLUM LANDING. As Jessie explains, families sometimes sign up for outdoor activities to get away from technology—but technology can be a powerful and effective tool to engage students and families outdoors. Jessie shares tips on using cameras, mobile devices, and other tools to enhance students' and families’ exploration of nature.

How to Help Families Feel Comfortable in the Outdoors | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he tackles common fears students and families may have about exploring nature in this video from PLUM LANDING. Jessie explains that helping students and families overcome fears about exploring the outdoors is an important part of any outdoor educator’s job. He shares his stratgies for calming common fears and encouraging students and families to feel comfortable in nature.

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Science Activity | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he shares his top five preparation tips for leading outdoor science activities in this video from PLUM LANDING. As Jessie explains, planning ahead can take the stress out of leading outdoor activities, and can help ensure a fun and successful experience for all. Preparation strategies include deciding on key concepts to address; making the science local; running through an activity beforehand; gathering and packing materials ahead of time; and planning for safety.

How to Promote Science Skills While Exploring the Outdoors | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he explains why the outdoors is a great place to explore science in this video from PLUM LANDING. Jessie shares his top strategies for engaging kids and familes in science, including asking questions and wondering aloud.

How to Manage Group Exploration of the Outdoors | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he shares his strategies for exploring the outdoors with a crowd in this video from PLUM LANDING. As Jessie explains, managing a large group during outdoor exploration can be overwhelming – but it’s easier than you might think to keep things on track. Key strategies include setting the stage; redirecting disruptive children, keeping things interesting; and knowing where everyone is at all times.

Race to Save Water

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Two families compete to see which can conserve the most water over one week, in this video from PLUM LANDING. They calculate and record how much water they use in their daily activities, such as showering, brushing their teeth, and flushing the toilet, and talk about ways to use less water for these and other activities. 

Earth to Blorb: Water!

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Learn about the water cycle and the age of Earth's water supply (it's really old!), in this video from PLUM LANDING. As Plum explains in this video postcard, there is no new water being made on the Earth—water is constantly reused through the water cycle—meaning that the water that we drink is the same water dinosaurs drank millions of years ago.  

Follow the Water

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Ella and her dad, Mike, track the path of melting snow on a warm winter day, in this video from PLUM LANDING. They follow it out of their driveway, to a small brook, through a tunnel, and eventually all the way to the ocean. On their journey, they discover how water carries trash and pollution with it.

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