Prairie Public

Bill Holm: Through the Window of Brimnes | The Poetry of Life in Iceland

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Holm reads some of his poetry with beautiful Iceland landscapes as a backdrop, and also tells the story of the Arctic tern. Meet poet, essayist, musician, teacher, mentor and iconoclast Bill Holm – a Minnesota native who escaped to his small cottage in Iceland every year to create and contemplate.

Bill Holm: Through the Window of Brimnes | The Love of Iceland and Brimnes

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Learn about the writer Bill Holm who introduced many to the beauty of Iceland and eventually bought a house there. Meet poet, essayist, musician, teacher, mentor and iconoclast Bill Holm – a Minnesota native who escaped to his small cottage in Iceland every year to create and contemplate.

Tom Brandau: Filmmaker

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Tom Brandau is a Baltimore native filmmaker who teaches at Minnesota State University in Moorhead. He shares what brought him to the filmmaking profession and gives some tips to students on how to become more marketable in the  fimmaking profession.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Roads from WWII to the Present

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Learn how World War II meant funding was diverted to all but strategic roads and highways. After the war, the state had to play catch-up on road maintenance, helped by federal funding of the interstate system. In today's world, larger and heavier trucks are critical to transporting freight. In rural North Dakota, providing local transit for a growing senior citizen population is a big issue.

Changing Face of Agriculture | Precision

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Farmers are stereotyped as being old fashioned and resistant to change, but today’s farmers embrace new technologies that make farming easier and more productive.  New farming equipment incorporates computer technology that makes farming a highly technological process.  Farmers are also using other technologies that help them know what to plant, how to plant and how to increase productivity.

Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps in Minnesota | Jay Cooke State Park

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Learn how Civilian Conservation Corps built the Swinging Bridge in Jay Cooke State Park, Minnesota.

Harsh Reality | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn about how the 1870s was an era of prosperity along the Red River, and the steamboat industry was flourishing, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. Seen as dashing and romantic, steamboats were the fastest way to travel great distances north and south along the Red River but not really the most comfortable. The boat itself was noisy and overcrowded; passengers had to deal with clouds of mosquitoes along the route; and the large boats ran aground often as they tried to negotiate tight bends in the river.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Nathan Jermison (Tioga)

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"This oil industry is running 250 miles per hour, and all the towns around us are running about 25,"explains Tioga, North Dakota, mayor Nathan Jermison. The people of Tioga once wanted to attract people to the small town, but the oil industry has brought too many too quickly, causing a strain on utilities and services.

Solve a Problem | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how the biggest hurdle in establishing a water route for trade was how to get a steamboat across the prairie from St. Paul to the Red River in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. The solution: a contest proposed by the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce with a cash prize to the first person to get a steamboat launched and operational.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Hydrogen: Nature's Fuel | Introduction and Fuel Cells

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Learn about hydrogen: nature's fuel which is used safely all around us every day -- in data centers, warehouses, golf courses, and even breweries. Also see how hydrogen and oxygen combine in a fuel cell to make clean electricity. The only by-products are pure water and heat. 

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