Prairie Public

Uganda: Sustainable Tourism | Makerere University Program

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about Makerere University and the University of Manitoba partnership. The goal is developing leadership and human resource capacity at the university level to provide sustained training and integration at all levels of the tourism industry.

A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson | Teacher and Visual Artist

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Gudmundson is both a Zen master in the classroom and a nationally recognized photographic artist.

Wayne Gudmundson’s black-and-white photographs are admired not only for their beauty, but also for their cultural significance – they capture the grandeur of Gudmundson’s native North Dakota landscape with a focus that evokes a meaningful sense of place. A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson chronicles the route this prolific photographer has taken – how his Icelandic heritage relates to his craft, the mentors and muses that inspire him, the students who enthuse him, and the philosophy that explains his considered view

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | “A Reluctant and Homesick Pig”

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the history of steamboats on the Red River. Although its course meandered like a lost and homesick pig, the Red River of the North was a major artery for steamboats, which coordinated with stagecoaches from St. Paul to Fort Abercrombie.

Managing Carbon Dioxide: The Geologic Solution - Carbon Capture and Storage

Icon: 
Streaming icon

A means of managing industrial CO2 that builds on 40 years of experience.

Stewards of the Land | Odegard Farm

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Growing a wide variety of grains, the Odegaards seeded marginal land to grass, mulch tilled, rotated grazing pasture and networked with other participating farmers. 

Red River Land | History of Travel | Getting to the Homestead

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Homesteaders could take a train part of the way to homestead in the Red River Valley, but after they got off the train, they had to find a way to get to unclaimed land.  These settlers used a variety of methods of transportation from walking to bicycles to wagons to steamboats, and, finally, on their farms, steam-powered tractors.

Water: The Lifeblood | A Power Plant with Its Own Reservoir

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The Milton R. Young Station draws water from a man-made reservoir for use in their power plant.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Tate Cymbaluk

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Tate Cymbaluk of Williston shows a stretch of grassland that is being developed commercially and will one day include a highway bypass around the city of Williston. Leases for the commercial property are never signed for less than five years, proving that the boom will be in western North Dakota for quite a bit of time. Cymbaluk also says,"We're fortunate to have work, let alone to this magnitude. We've got to feel very blessed and very fortunate. We just have to keep reminding people of that."

Old Red Trail | Resisting the Interstate

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The modern interstate system was not universally welcomed in North Dakota.  Plans for Interstate 94 included dividing some farms, bypassing towns, restricting water drainage, and limited access.  Interviews with North Dakotans in this clip include reminiscences about the early days of the interstate, such as one person who recalled when someone tampered with construction by pulling out stakes and piling them neatly next to the future road’s path.  Even teaching North Dakotans how to use the interchanges and on- and off-ramps was a challenge after the Old Red Trail became the state’s first interstate highway.

High Risk High: Interview - Nicole Griffin

Icon: 
Streaming icon

A student at UND, Griffin grew up with alcoholic parents and says that her family’s happiness was determined by alcohol. She speaks of broken promises and lack of trust that she carried beneath her mask of happiness. Planning a career in addiction studies, she speaks enthusiastically of breaking down the walls of silence for other families.

Pages